Is Minecraft Safe for Kids?

minecraft on a phone

Minecraft is one of the world’s most popular video game titles amongst children. Despite being a popular single-player game, it has an online multiplayer component that can make understanding the game’s safety difficult for a parent or guardian. Below are all the potential dangers of Minecraft and how you can avoid them.

Is Minecraft an Online Game?

Minecraft - Main Screen
Minecraft features both online and offline play options. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

Minecraft is a video game with both online and offline components, so it can be difficult for parents to understand if their child is playing online with other people. You should ask your child how they play the game and learn what system they use to play it.

Online play can come with its own dangers, but there is much less to worry about if your child is playing the game alone.

Minecraft Scams

The console versions of Minecraft offer in-game purchases. These can be different costumes or maps for the player to use while in the game.

In-app purchases allow hackers to target children. There have been cases where young people have been defrauded of money by trying to buy in-game items from scammers. The best way to avoid this happening to your child is to educate them about spending money online.

You can use our guide to prevent children from spending money online to help educate your child.

Interacting with Predators

If your child plays Minecraft online, then there’s a danger they’ll interact with strangers. It is possible to play only with online friends, but if a stranger adds your child as a friend, they can gain access. You must teach your child not to accept friend requests from strangers.

In the past, mass protests have been held over the prevalence of child predators on Minecraft. The best way to protect your child is to educate them about the dangers and ensure they only play with their friends.

You should be aware Minecraft has an unfiltered text chat on PC. Your child will be able to send and receive messages of any kind if they play online.

Our guide to safe online participation can help you to teach your child safe internet usage.

Minecraft Addiction

Minecraft is an addicting game, so one of the biggest dangers is that your child could become addicted to playing the game. There have been cases in the past where children’s grades have slipped, and they’ve even stolen money from parents to pour into the game.

If you notice your child spending hours every day playing the game, then it may be time to intervene. Children with ADD are particularly at risk of game addiction, and any child can show withdrawal symptoms.

How to Avoid These Dangers

Minecraft - Settings
Familiarizing yourself with Minecraft’s settings can help you to keep your child safe. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

You should be sure to get involved with how your child plays Minecraft if you want to prevent these dangers. The game itself is harmless and can be a great creative outlet for children. Ask them questions about how they play the game, and make sure you know who it is they’re playing with.

If you feel capable, try to play the game yourself. If you can, try playing the game with your child. Not only will you understand the game even better, but it can become a positive bonding experience.

Ensure your child knows the dangers inherent with the internet in general and online gaming specifically. Ensure the first person your child comes to when something goes wrong is you.

Your child must understand the money they spend online is money spent in the real world. Closely monitor how much time and money they’re putting into the game, and be ready to step in if either gets out of control.

If you’re worried about your kids’ online safety, read some of our articles on the subject here.

Has your child lost their Minecraft account? Order immediate help from us here.

Featured image by rafapress from Shutterstock.com

William Worrall
A gaming and technology writer who has been building computers and tinkering with software since he was a teenager. Previously involved with various prestigious websites, including TechRaptor.net and CCN.COM. Now tutorial creator for Hacked.com.

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