ICO Analysis: Worldcore

From the perspective of ICOs, Worldcore stands apart for the fact that it is already known as a successful payment solution. Established in 2014, the Czech-based company offers an online transfer service that specializes in bank wires, prepaid withdrawal cards, instant credit card payments and free money transfers.

The company only recently announced plans to create a peer-to-peer lending platform hosted over the blockchain. While some may say Worldcore is being opportunistic, it boasts a client base of more than 25,000 people across the globe. In 2017, it has already cleared $100 million in transaction volume.

As a regulated payment solution with an EU license to operate in the Czech Republic, Worldcore has had great success in its first few years. It has an established track record, a decent business model and aspirations of global expansion. It also picked the right time to enter crypto.

But that doesn’t mean Worldcore doesn’t have limitations. As we’ll discuss in the following sections, the company’s lofty valuation is more than just a pat on the back for the good work it has done in recent years.

If that isn’t enough, we invite anyone to visit the company’s site (or is it, this one?) and try to make sense exactly what it is that Worldcore offers. The author isn’t proud to admit he had to visit several third-party websites just to figure out that the company is an online transfer service. You might be thinking, bad copywriters? Maybe. But what if we told you Worldcore is also planning to launch a 24/7 TV service? From the scant details we were able to obtain from the whitepaper, WorldcoreTV will be launched if and when the company raises $25 million. On that note, the whitepaper is a 73-page poster that doesn’t offer much to the tech-savvy investor.

Worldcore Token

Worldcore launched its WRC token Oct. 14 on the Ethereum blockchain. One WRC is valued at $0.10 USD, with a total market cap of $100 million USD. A total of 1 billion tokens will be circulated during the ICO. Investors can participate in the raise using fiat currencies like the euro and U.S. dollar, as well as cryptocurrencies.

Worldcore’s motivation for the crowdraise is to leverage the blockchain in pursuit of bigger business. The company isn’t just dabbing its foot in the ledger technology, but actually converting its business operation to enable greater blockchain capability.

In its whitepaper, the company emphasizes the following target audience for its services:

  • Freelancers
  • Big companies
  • Fundraisers
  • Online shops and retailers
  • Online marketplaces
  • Common people
  • All kinds of small business

With a list like that, it’s clear Worldcore is thinking very big. The company’s global reach is demonstrated by the fact that it has translated its website into more than ten languages.

Anyone who wants to send money overseas, facilitate business-to-business transactions and utilize unique security enhancements like voice recognition is Worldcore’s target market.

The company has an aggressive roadmap that begins by obtaining membership of the major credit cards, SWIFT and SEPA networks by Q1 2018. With $10 million in funding, it plans to open “5 fully-packed offices in 5 more EU countries” by Q1 2019. If it reaches $25 million in funding, it will launch its WorldcoreTV service, “the world’s first 24/7 hybrid of TV channel and digital media focused on Fintech & BlockChain industries with online and international 24/7 broadcasting through Satellite and IPTV.”

At $50 million raised, the company plans to transform into a Swiss bank. It believes it can do this by mid-2019.

WRC tokens are essentially a stake in the newly developed blockchain-focused company. In other words, think of your WRC tokens as stocks. There doesn’t seem to be any direct use of the tokens within the company’s network, except to reap profits from Worldcore’s business growth. Worldcore is offering 30% profit to its investors.

If “slow money” isn’t your style, you can trade the WRC token on the digital currency exchange. This option will be available to token holders immediately. The company says it will provide a full list of exchanges where WRC is accepted at the end of the ICO.

The Team

In terms of personnel, there’s quite a bit of clout behind the Worldcore executive. Founder and CEO Alex Nasonov was listed in the Financial Times annual ranking of New Europe 100 changemakers in Central and Eastern Europe. The company also has a solid list of general partners that includes Bitpay.

Against this backdrop, the author has little doubt that Worldcore is home to a solid team. However, very little information is provided about them, their credentials or the advisers they’ve selected.

Based on the whitepaper, Worldcore is home to at least three developers, 20-plus support and development staff and a core team of managers. The company also consults with advisers, but does not name them.

The team operates in accordance with EU law, so there’s little to be concerned about from the perspective of legitimacy, regulation and business ethics.

Verdict

Worldcore is a highly ambitious company with a proven track record in its niche market. But as an outsider, understanding the company’s service offerings and assigning it a valuation has proven difficult. We feel that the strategy behind the capital raise veers away from the company’s core service offering. As an outsider, the roadmap for growth seems a little far fetched (as a reminder, Worldcore says it can become a full-fledged Swiss bank in less than two years).

Risks 

  • At $100 million USD, Worldcore is significantly overvalued. Although the company doesn’t state its revenues, the price tag is too high for what it currently offers. Of course, this hard cap is based on potential, but the author isn’t too excited about WorldcoreTV. -5
  • The roadmap for growth makes very little sense. Capital raise via ICO makes even less sense from the information we gathered from the whitepaper and the website. -3
  • Although the development team has been involved in blockchain since 2016, there’s no mention of blockchain or cryptocurrency expertise or experience. The team has done a good job offering an online payment service, but what exactly does this mean from the perspective of blockchain? By the looks of it, Worldcore is taking a deep dive into this technology. Can we really be sure it’s going about it the right way? -3
  • Competition looms large for any blockchain-based payment service. This will work against Worldcore, which, again, has very little experience. -3

Potential Growth

  • Worldcore is scaling up its core services quickly, and the company expects to clear $150 million in transaction volume this year. +4
  • The company’s CEO has established a good track record that has not gone unrecognized. +1

Disposition

Based on the above, we assign the Worldcore ICO a rating of 1 out of 10. The holes in the business plan are simply too glaring to even consider funding a project of this nature. We certainly don’t take anything away from the company’s growth, but the project idea does not compute.

Hacked.com members have a high propensity for spotting shoddy whitepapers. The Worldcore write-up is one of the weakest seen. Once again, we invite our members to give it a read and share if they have any unique or differing perspectives.

Investment Details

For more information about the Worldcore token raise, visit the main website.

  • Project Type: Crowdsale
  • Opening Date: Oct. 14, 2017
  • End Date; Nov. 14, 2017
  • Platform: Ethereum (ETH)
  • Total Supply: 1 billion tokens
  • Token Price: $0.10 USD (all unsold tokens will be burned upon the ICO’s closure)

Featured image courtesy of Shutterstock. 

Author:
Chief Editor to Hacked.com and Contributor to CCN.com, Sam Bourgi has spent the past nine years focused on economics, markets and cryptocurrencies. His work has been featured in and cited by some of the world's leading newscasts, including Barron's, CBOE and Forbes. Avid crypto watchers and those with a libertarian persuasion can follow him on twitter at @hsbourgi