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Amazon Resets Passwords of Customers’ Accounts; Possible Leak

Amazon Resets Passwords of Customers’ Accounts; Possible Leak

by Samburaj DasNovember 24, 2015

Amazon has hit the password-reset button on an unknown number of customer accounts with the obvious fear that passwords are likely compromised.

Citing security issues, retailing giant Amazon has reset a yet-unknown number of customer accounts’ passwords, according to numerous readers of ZDNet. The publication cites several readers who supposedly received an email from Amazon to be notified of a password reset affecting their accounts.

The same message, ZDNet adds, was sent to the account message center on Amazon’s US and UK domains which confirmed the authenticity of the message.

The email from Amazon stated:

[Amazon] recently discovered that your [Amazon account] password may have been improperly stored on your device or transmitted to Amazon in a way that could potentially expose it to a third party.

The email adds that there is  “no reason” to believe that passwords may have been compromised. Citing “an abundance of caution” for the impromptu password resets, the online retailer added that it has “corrected the issue to prevent this exposure.”

It is entirely normal for web-based companies to hit the reset button on account passwords for reasons of a possible password leak or worse, a data breach.

A spokesperson for Amazon did not immediately respond to Hacked’s request for more details at the time of publishing.

Amazon can ill-afford a breach or compromised customer accounts at a time when retailers are prepping themselves for the busiest time of the shopping calendar with Black Friday and the subsequent web-centric Cyber Monday looming over the horizon.

Retailers are often the targets of malicious hackers who see online stores such as Amazon to be a trove of confidential and financial data of millions of users. Data breaches often result in the theft of millions of customers’ credit and debit card details which are then sold to darknet markets—often in a different continent altogether – to result in fraudulent transactions.

We will keep you updated on this developing story.

Featured image from Amazon.

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  • Rose Marie Ezell

    So I called Amazon about this and they said this was a rumor. Who’s lying here?