How to Recover a Hacked Linkedin Account

LinkedIn logo on blue background

Linkedin is a service used by many professionals, but not everyone takes security on the site seriously. Losing access to your Linkedin accounts can be a serious blow to your career and cause undue stress. So what should you do if hackers attack your account and steal it away from you? Below is our guide for recovering your hacked Linkedin account.

How to Recover a Hacked LinkedIn Account

1. Act Immediately

The most important factor when hackers attack your account is speed. As soon as you have any suspicion that your account is in danger, it would help if you took immediate action. If you fail to act on your suspicions, you could lose access to your account permanently.

2. Change Your Password

Hackers first target when in your account will be your password. If you can still access your account, changing your password should be your first move.

Log into your Linkedin account and click the small triangle underneath the ‘Me’ heading.

Linkedin - Account Page
Image 1 of password change tutorial. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

From the drop-down menu that appears, select ‘Settings & Privacy.’

Linkedin - Account Drop-Down
Image 2 of password change tutorial. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

On your account settings page, click ‘Sign in & security’ in the panel on the screen’s left.

Linkedin - Account Settings Page
Image 1 of password change tutorial. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

Under the ‘Change password heading, click ‘Change.’

Linkedin - Login Settings Page
Image 4 of password change tutorial. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

Please enter your current password to confirm your identity, then enter your new password twice to make sure you’ve spelled it correctly. Now click ‘Save’ to finish changing your password.

Linkedin - Password Change
Image 5 of password change tutorial. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

We highly recommend that you use a password manager and password generator when choosing your new password. Strong passwords are an essential part of good cybersecurity, and a password manager prevents you from needing to use the same password across multiple sites.

3. Linkedin Account Recovery

If you can no longer access your account or suspect that your password has been changed, you will need to go through Linkedin account recovery.

Go to the Linkedin login page and click ‘Forgot Password?’

Linkedin - Login Page
Image 1 of recovery tutorial. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

Enter the email address or phone number associated with your account, and click ‘Find Account.’

Linkedin - Account Search
Image 2 of account recovery tutorial. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

Enter the verification code sent to your email address or phone and click ‘Submit’ to confirm your identity.

Linkedin - Verification
Image 3 of account recovery tutorial. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

If you have 2FA enabled, you may have to enter another code from your app or phone.

Be advised: If you are going to use an app instead of your phone number as the 2FA option, then you must ensure you keep backup codes or that you use Authy, the authenticator app, with a cloud backup. If you lose your phone without a backup of your 2FA-codes to log in, you’ll lose access to your account.

Linkedin Authentication
Image 4 of account recovery tutorial. | Source: Hacked/W.S.Worrall

Enter your new password twice to confirm you’ve spelled it correctly. Click ‘Submit’ to finalize your new password.

Once you’ve followed these steps, visit our securing guide to keep your Linkedin account safe from hackers.

Featured image by Ink Drop from Shutterstock.com

Related Posts



How to Secure Your Linkedin Account
A gaming and technology writer who has been building computers and tinkering with software since he was a teenager. Previously involved with various prestigious websites, including TechRaptor.net and CCN.COM. Now tutorial creator for Hacked.com.

[email protected]com

Phone support: +1 334 625 9990
7AM-7PM CDT weekday, 8AM-3PM CDT Saturday
We are not able to answer all calls.
For a guaranteed response, please use email.




We have been recommended to clients by employees at FBI and local law enforcement in the United States. For references, please send us an email.






         



Read all of our reviews here.