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Where in the World to ICO Part 1: Singapore

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The market has suffered a huge downtrend this week – a period filled with mostly government rumblings. The SEC has changed its tune. It is becoming a lot more vocal, which is certainly throwing prices off course. As an investor, these are the prices I want to buy in to. Ethereum is below $600, Ripple was playing in the $0.60s and NEO is still currently sitting at $68. However, I am not putting a dime into any of these exchanges. All government senses are in hyperdrive right now. They smell money, and they want their cut of it.

If I go into Coinbase with more cash, I do think it’s going to be treated a lot differently than it was when I first invested. Coinbase, along with Kraken, Gemini and others, are being harassed from all angles to start acting like a securities exchange and give people tax bills. We knew this was coming, but it wasn’t done as we were promised in the first congressional meeting in February.

There is no reason to start handing out subpoenas to ICOs and exchanges before rules have been set. Once there are rules surrounding primary and secondary offerings of cryptocurrency, then there can be enforcement of the rules. Overall, it was a very disappointing week for the United States and its role in cryptocurrency. As in any democracy with powerful government agencies, there is a vested interest in making something bigger than it is.

Crypto Countries

I wanted to take a look into countries doing things correctly when it came to cryptocurrency, and how they were doing it. I looked into the best countries for primary offerings. Having a place to spend your bitcoin is great, but if there isn’t blockchain commerce taking place within the country, there is always the risk of having those liberties taken away from you. The ideal countries are ones that have an endorsed ICO culture, and have a population of interested parties already operating. There is strength in numbers.

Cryptocurrency has lifted the veil for a lot of people on the capabilities of governments restricting them from doing things. This has not sat well with the new generation. We are seeing people traveling all around the world to government endorsed blockchain meet-ups to sniff out how well the country would treat them. The countries that are openly welcoming that change may be in for an inflow of capital through employment, investment and migration. I will be doing a series on the different countries best poised to be a friendly place to settle down with your earnings, and maybe start a DAPP or two.

Background

We are going to assume that our hypothetical ICO has a working prototype that we would like to launch as a utility token. In order to get on a Binance, Kucoin, etc., you will need to (1) be a utility token and (2) have a written document from a lawyer from your jurisdiction that definitively says that you are a utility token.

To be a fully compliant utility token, you must not have taken funding prior to the ICO, there must be a use case at the time of ICO (if you want to be safe), and have no U.S. investment. The SEC has made sure that any money made off its citizens is going to have a very bright light shined on it, and that they will label it as a securities offering. There is no reason to get involved with that.

Singapore

One of the most technology-friendly places that one can go is Singapore. This country is ranked 7th in GDP per capita at $90,500. With a population of 5.1 million, Singapore is in the same class as countries like Monaco and Lichtenstein. The government and regulatory authorities have been way ahead of the game, having already made definitive statements on how their country defines tokens and securities.

The reason they have been able to do this is their size. There is only one regulatory body that oversees all financial institutions, and that is the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS). Because of this, the government relies holistically on MAS to determine the most progressive and forward thinking laws to continue to promote business in the country.

MAS

Created in 1971 to oversee monetary functions related to banking and finance, MAS has since grown to oversee all investment, insurance, banking and monetary policy within the country. Think of this as the Fed, SEC, FINRA and CTFC rolled into one single regulatory body. Ironically, MAS has so much strength that it doesn’t use it aggressively. They want markets to be autonomous enough to be entrepreneurial. They have even invested in technology that would limit their role!

MAS has been the overseeer of “Smart Nation,” a government initiative to innovate Singapore’s infrastructure. Smart Nation was created in 2014 by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong. His plan was to spend $2.4 billion in the private sector by engaging with start-ups, not funding them. Rather than having them work with no connection to the country, he wanted them to build the technological infrastructure of Singapore. MAS was tasked with creating the sub-initiatives within the country that different entrepreneurs could work on.

ITMs

The end product of MAS and other government agencies was Industry Transformation Maps (ITMs), which are roadmaps for almost every industry within Singapore. A total of 23 ITMs are to be launched with different characteristics and incentives attached to them based on industry.

The Financial Services ITM was launched on October 31, 2017. Spooky. It did not disappoint, and has already mentioned that blockchain will be actively used (and incentivized) within their insurance industry for better risk management, placements and offerings. I think they were very careful not to mention cryptocurrency within an ITM. Both MAS and broader government are actively watching it, but they are watching politely. Not making noise, and trying to make the buffers wide.

Government Timeline

August 2017

August of 2017 was a hot time in the ICO market. Singapore and MAS were one of the first governments to come out with a direct interpretation of cryptocurrencies. Case in point, MAS clarified its position on the matter in the following quote:

“MAS’ position of not regulating virtual currencies is similar to that of most jurisdictions. However, MAS has observed that the function of digital tokens has evolved beyond just being a virtual currency. For example, digital tokens may represent ownership or a security interest over an issuer’s assets or property. Such tokens may therefore be considered an offer of shares or units in a collective investment scheme1 under the SFA. Digital tokens may also represent a debt owed by an issuer and be considered a debenture under the SFA.”

This allowed for active utility token primary offerings within the boundaries that were set after this statement. With MAS being the only voice needed, there was an immediate public sector response to private sector innovation.

October 2017

A member of the Singapore Parliament asked a “parliamentary question,” which apparently makes it a public question that requires a public answer. On Oct. 3, 2017, the Deputy Prime Minister of Singapore then responded via blog post.  Let’s just say this blog post was something that had Twitter cheering.

“MAS does not and cannot regulate all products that people put their money in thinking that they will appreciate in value.”

This was one of the key quotes that came from the Deputy Prime Minister, indicating that they were letting the crypto market play out with minimal intervention.

December 2017

MAS came out with a caution against cryptocurrencies on Dec. 19, 2017. Remember, this was around the time that the EOS ICO shocked the pants off investors by raising $800 million within weeks.

“MAS considers the recent surge in the prices of cryptocurrencies to be driven by speculation. The risk of a sharp reduction in prices is high. Investors in cryptocurrencies should be aware that they run the risk of losing all their capital.”

That sounds like a Twitter post from a blockchain advocate to me. Even during a period where there was money flooding into coins that didn’t even make sense, they still held their ground and determined it wasn’t their place to intervene.

February 2018

The Prime Minister (AGAIN!), came out and had a discussion with the public his stance on cryptocurrency and regulation. This made him one of the only government officials bold enough to come out and state his exact stance on how everything ought to be regulated. There are probably two or three world leaders who can have an intelligent conversation blockchain, and he is the best of them.

“Cryptocurrencies are an experiment. The number and different forms of cryptocurrencies are growing internationally. It is too early to say if they will succeed.”

Once again, another cautiously bullish stance. He also clarified he still sees no reason to limit the activity on cryptocurrency exchanges within the country. This is a unified voice. There aren’t congressional hearings with irrational and irrelevant opinions being offered. The prime minister has relied on MAS to keep the country safe, while endorsing any type of commerce that the country could take part in.

March 2018

Managing Director Ravi Menon of MAS spoke on crypto currency at the Money 20/20 Asia Conference held in Singapore on Mar. 15. It seems as if every person within both MAS and the government itself are unafraid to make their stance known on a technology that most people are scratching their heads about.

“Some of the best minds in the field are applying their creative energies to make crypto tokens mainstream. With technology, never say never,” Menon said.

During his speech he even said that he was in active discussions with government officials to monitor the situation with “great interest” but also “not stifle innovation.”

Implementations

The crypto market has seen broad implementation within Singapore. Below are a few examples.

OBike: This is a Singapore version of Barclay’s Bikes/Citibank Bikes that are all over London and New York City, respectively. They have partnered with Chinese company Tron to work with them on launching OCoins, their own currency within the network of bikes. Users can both buy OCoins and generate them from using the service. The CEO of OBike believes that OCoins could be the proper incentive for people to continue using the bikes, and find new reasons to hop on one. This type of offering could never take place in the United States. Each of the bike users would have to get their lawyer to overlook the Private Placement documents every time they wanted to use the bike.

Enjin Coin: This Singapore Operated ICO raised $12 million in September 2017. The purpose of the coin is to act as digital incentives within the game Minecraft. It has since performed quite well, with its success raising the prospect of new jobs within the country. They average 60 million views per month on their gaming creation platform, and this has still yet to be implemented within the game.

Ripple: The ITM of Financial Services expressed Singapore’s essential role as wealth management and forex leader of Asia. That was the dinner bell for Ripple, whose technology can drastically lower the costs of transacting in different currencies and sending across borders. Standard Charter Bank, a Singapore banking incumbent for over 150 years, recently trialed Ripple’s XCurrent product for cross border payment processing. There was no use of XRP (yet), but this is one of the most well-developed banks in the world using new technology at a time when there is a lot of negative publicity surrounding everything in cryptocurrency.

Project Ubin: One non-ITM MAS initiative was to re-design the monetary infrastructure of the country through distributed ledger technology. This could reduce total reliance on central banking in the future. Processes and data are distributed across all users of the network. MAS would be tasked with making sure that all nodes were behaving properly, and updating their software for security and performance purposes.

Phase 1: Distributed ledger technology trials began in May 2017. The main purpose was to try to digitize the Singapore dollar onto the blockchain. They wanted to assess the different productive functions it could have with transactions, storage and security. They worked with different institutions with the help of consulting firm Deloitte.

Phase 2: MAS updated Project Ubin in November 2017 with the next phase: bank to bank transactions. MAS is the epicenter of all financial transactions, settlements and currency exchanges. This phase was going to limit the costs they already incur, while also seeing what types of options were available. I guess the Ripple meeting makes sense.

Conclusion

Singapore is perhaps the only country that has such well-read blockchain regulators. They are making decisions carefully, and not trying to interfere. Of course, there are frauds and scams that must be dealt with. I am extremely confident that a government like this has already found ways to make sure that there are at least some guard rails within the marketplace.

There is clear evidence of legislation, and continuous public re-enforcement of that legislation. Most countries are hurting their chances at a technological migration each day. Inaction and fiery rhetoric have already caused many to leave their home countries in search of a more favorable climate for this new technology. Singapore is certainly putting up a true fight to become that landing spot.

 

I will be making this a series, so I will continue to write about the crypto climbate of each country. Clearly no recommendations to buy or sell cryptocurrency. But, perhaps a recommendation to move with all your Bitcoins. Best of luck and trade safely- @Raijincrypto

Sources

http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/obike-partners-blockchain-platform-tron-to-launch-cryptocurrency-ocoins-for

http://www.mas.gov.sg/News-and-Publications/Media-Releases/2017/MAS-cautions-against-investments-in-cryptocurrencies.aspx

http://www.mas.gov.sg/News-and-Publications/Media-Releases/2017/MAS-clarifies-regulatory-position-on-the-offer-of-digital-tokens-in-Singapore.aspx

http://www.straitstimes.com/business/companies-markets/tharman-no-strong-case-yet-to-ban-cryptocurrency-trading-in-spore

Featured image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

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4.4 stars on average, based on 27 rated postsMythological God of Lightning. Cryptocurrency/Blockchain writer, evangelist, and friend. May the odds be ever in our favor.




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2 Comments

  1. johnnyquid

    March 18, 2018 at 2:43 pm

    Looking forward to the series.

  2. febrocas

    March 18, 2018 at 9:41 pm

    Thank you so much for this Raiden. This article is super useful to understand the global mindset of regulators. Nice work!

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Regulation

G20’s Financial Watchdog Unveils Plan to Monitor Cryptocurrency Threat

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The Group of 20’s Financial Stability Board (FSB) has outlined a comprehensive plan to monitor the cryptocurrency market and rein in what it believes to be material risks to the global financial system.

G20 Unveils Crypto Framework

The G20’s financial regulator on Monday unveiled its strategy for determining whether cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin and Ethereum represent a risk to financial stability. In a ten-page report, the FSB lays out a framework that can assist G20 nations in identifying crypto-related risks using publicly-available data.

According to the report, metrics “that are most likely to highlight such risks” include market capitalization (size and growth rate), price levels and volatility. Basically, cryptocurrencies that exhibit unusually large growth rates and volatility may pose a risk to financial stability if their total value rivals that of more conventional markets.

FSB officials provide a further breakdown of what they call wealth effect metrics and institutional metrics. Initial coin offerings (ICOs) and capital flows into the blockchain arena are classified as wealth effect metrics. On the institutional side, the FSB recommends monitoring trading volumes, margin levels and interest among traditional lenders.

The FSB says the framework “should help to identify and mitigate risks to consumer and investor protection, market integrity, and potentially to financial stability.”

FSB Expands Oversight Efforts

In March, Hacked reported that the FSB was evaluating the cryptocurrency market but had not identified it as a major risk to financial stability.

To that effect, Bank of England (BOE) Governor and FSB head Mark Carney issued the following statement:

“The FSB’s initial assessment is that crypto-assets do not pose risks to global financial stability at this time. This is in part because they are small relative to the financial system.

“Their small size, and the fact that they are not substitutes for currency and with very limited use for real economy and financial transactions, has meant the linkages to the rest of the financial system are limited.”

At the time the statement was issued, the total cryptocurrency market was valued at roughly $300 billion, not far from current levels. The market peaked above $830 billion earlier this year, prompting an investigation into crypto-assets.

While cryptocurrencies represent only a tiny fraction of the global financial system, their direct and indirect contribution to the economy is far greater. The crypto boom has generated an entire economy devoted to maintaining the size and growth rate of digital assets, as well as a bustling startup community whose funding has exceeded that of early stage venture capital.

For many, institutional interest represents the next frontier of digital currency adoption. Major banks and hedge funds are already experimenting with blockchain technology and the launch of bitcoin futures has given rise to a new breed of investor accessing digital assets.

The race for custodial services and efforts to launch the first bitcoin ETF also suggest that the market has potential to attract large sums of capital. These developments suggest that Carney may have to revise his previous statement about crypto assets having a limited use for the real economy.

Disclaimer: The author owns bitcoin, Ethereum and other cryptocurrencies. He holds investment positions in the coins, but does not engage in short-term or day-trading.

Featured image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

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4.6 stars on average, based on 498 rated postsSam Bourgi is Chief Editor to Hacked.com, where he specializes in cryptocurrency, economics and the broader financial markets. Sam has nearly eight years of progressive experience as an analyst, writer and financial market commentator where he has contributed to the world's foremost newscasts.




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Regulation

India’s Central Bank Spells Out Its Cryptocurrency Reservations As Panel Readies Regulatory Draft

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Indian Government Blocks GitHub, Vimeo, and Others for Hosting ISIS Content

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI), which cracked down on cryptocurrencies without much discussion, has offered an explanation a month later, as a government panel considers a draft of regulations, according to Quartz.

The concerns include the currencies’ insufficient intrinsic value, investor protection and anonymous transactions, the central bank explained to the Internet and Mobile Association of India (IAMAI), which includes bitcoin exchanges.

IAMAI members have suggested regulations to the RBI and dispute all of the central bank’s concerns.

Some bitcoin exchanges legally challenged the central bank after it instructed banks in April to close cryptocurrency accounts in the first week of July. In May, the country’s supreme court responded to that challenge by instructing the exchanges to address the RBI directly. The exchanges then submitted their suggestions.

This month, the court chose not to stay the April order, but instructed the RBI to respond to the exchanges’ suggestions.

An IAMAI member indicated the central bank, in its responses to the suggestions, said the RBI saw a need to protect banks and investors from frauds and noted there have been several scams.

The exchanges claim that an indiscriminate ban is not the right way o fight scams.

Praveen Kumar, CEO and chairman of Belfrics, an exchange based in Malaysia and active in India, said limiting cryptocurrency bank transactions and enabling more cash transactions leaves more people vulnerable to duplicity. Rather than a bank, the RBI should establish guidelines for exchanges to follow to prevent frauds.

In addition, frauds occur wherever money is involved, including with banks, noted a CEO for a cryptocurrency exchange in New Delhi who did not want to be identified for publication.

Regarding the central bank’s concern about anonymous transactions, the exchanges said they follow know-your-customer rules that can prevent money laundering. In addition, most transactions occur by means of bank account transfers that serve to monitor the transactions.

Regarding the concern about cryptocurrencies’ lack of intrinsic value, the CEO of another exchange who requested anonymity said this claim is not completely true.

To operate certain computer programs, a user can pay with Ether. And, as more institutions and individuals begin to use cryptocurrencies, there will be more use cases to improve intrinsic value.

One cryptocurrency exchange CEO complained that the central bank raised similar concerns earlier but has refused to consider the recommendations.

A finance ministry panel has been established to explore cryptocurrency regulations. An official who requested anonymity said the panel is not thinking of banning cryptocurrencies, but wants to regulate them so regulators can be able to trace transactions. The official said permitting cryptocurrencies to exist as commodities is being considered.

The official compared cryptocurrencies to traditional trading markets. In traditional stock markets, traders trade in different asset classes, which is not illegal.

Cryptocurrency trading is no different, the official said.

A mechanism that would ensure the funds are not used illegally is needed, the official said, and the most important thing is the ability to track its source.

The panel expects to publish a draft of regulations this month, the secretary of the economic affairs department and the head of the panel announced last month.

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Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

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Crypto Regulation: A Tectonic Shift Is Occurring

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What caused the crypto crash that began last December?  There are some observers silly enough to believe it was all the fault of the CBOE by starting the first Bitcoin futures contracts.  Others believe it was just the bursting of a bubble that was long overdue.

Most likely, the ban on crypto exchanges by the Chinese government and the fear of a total ban on ownership played a very big role in starting the selling wave.  That wave has continued practically to this day. But there is evidence that things are changing.

Since the moves by China, virtually every publication worth its weight in Satoshi has been fueling fears of suffocating governmental regulation.  We’re taking nothing away from these folks because regulation is a big factor for investors.

Barron’s: Regulate Out of Existence

After reading last weeks edition of Barron’s I concluded we have reached the worst in the mania over regulation.  Three of the world’s most “respected” economists, according to Barron’s, Joseph Stiglitz, Nouriel Roubini and Kenneth Rogoff, put the kibosh on crypto on the sole basis that it will be “regulated into oblivion”.  This is just the sort of editorial approach that Barron’s has long been known for.

Of course, there was the volatility versus storehouse of value argument and the declaration that nobody uses Bitcoin as a medium of exchange so it can never be worth anything. The shortcoming of so many economists is their insistence on being chained to history.  

It Is All About Money

After a period of largely negative regulatory developments during the past seven months, signs are emerging that things are changing as governments get more familiar with the benefits of nurturing blockchain technology and crypto. In the end, it is all about governments finally figuring ways to make money from crypto. Once that occurs, they realize, we are all in the same boat.

The Regulatory Paradox

This brings things to what some observers refer to the government regulation paradox. In other words, investors need government to deter price manipulation and other scams. But the unregulated autonomous nature is a big reason that investors bought into crypto in the first place.  So far the trick has been to find a middle ground.

If you take a long look at the issue there is a new trend emerging.  One by one governments are beginning to appreciate the importance of blockchain technology and the role of cryptocurrencies.  The initial adversarial role is being replaced with a more cooperative attitude. Crypto values aren’t going to increase exponentially overnight as a result. Nevertheless, having cooperative regulators is critical to mass acceptance.  Here are a few encouraging signs.

SEC declares Bitcoin and Ether Non Securities

It has been some time now that the US Securities and Exchange Commission ruled that neither Bitcoin or Ether were securities.  The idea is that, so long as there is no conveyance of ownership, everybody is safe. This includes most ICOs as well even though a formal ruling has yet to be given.  This clears up a giant cloud that investors have pretty much ignored.

Changing Government Attitudes in Switzerland

As the U.S. and other countries attempt to exert greater AML and KYC rules, projects are leaving in favor of places like Singapore, Malta and Gibraltar where a connection to the international banking system is available. Information coming from Switzerland predicts that by year end, Swiss banks will be open to dealing with crypto.  As the traditional home of banking secrecy, Switzerland is the ideal place for crypto to make inroads. For the Swiss economy, it is all about finance. Last year, ICO projects brought in almost $1.5 billion that Swiss bankers were losing out on. This could prove to be a landmark decision.

Upstaging China

On any given day, Asia can account for a big share of global crypto trading.  Seven months ago the Chinese government actions threatened the health of the market.  This is understandingly leading governments elsewhere to open their doors.

Improving Asian Trading

Asian regulators are standing by to take advantage of any serious restrictions in China. In Thailand, the securities industry association is working with regulators to establish a joint cryptocurrency exchange and is working with the Thai SEC to get an operating license.  And this month the SEC approved a new two-tier vetting procedure to create accredited ICOs.

All this was made possible because the Thai government wasted no time in declaring crypto as digital assets and skipped the endless debate.  Sometimes a government dictatorship has its advantages.

And finally, signs of improvement in Japanese regulations are being reported that could lead to creating a market for crypto ETFs.

Wrapping Up

It is entirely possible that government regulation could be one of the most boring topics in the history of mankind. But we can all agree that it has hurt every long term crypto investor. We can also agree that there has been a lot of “piling on” by the media this entire year. So I decided to take on a thankless task in the interest of providing some balance to opinions of professors Stiglitz, Roubini and Rogoff. Thanks for keeping me company.

Featured image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

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