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Watch A Tiny Usb Necklace Called ‘USBdriveby’ Hack Into Your Computer

Watch A Tiny Usb Necklace Called ‘USBdriveby’ Hack Into Your Computer

by Clay Michael GillespieDecember 20, 2014

Lets talk about things that are horrifying. It’s not every day that we get to see someone so tech savvy that they can develop a device to compromise a computer in seconds. It’s even more impressive and terrifying though when that person disguises it as a fashionable necklace.

Samy Kamkar is someone you never want to mess with while you leave your computer unattended. Frankly, he’s not someone you want to mess with at all. At 17 years old, Kamkar cofounded his communications company named Fonality. The company raised more than $46 million in funding, and Kamkar went on to showcase his technology skills in other interesting ventures.

Kamkar can not only create his own company; he can hack Myspace with the famous worm called Samy and hack a nearby drone with his drone called SkyJack. He can then, of course, control that drone to do his bidding. Kamkar also created Evercookie, a cookie that can never be deleted. Subsequently, Edward Snowden leaked the 2013 documentation noting that the National Security Agency (NSA) utilized Evercookie to track Tor users.

Also read: More Than 700 Million Internet Users Avoiding NSA Surveillance According to New Survey

Bottom Line Is Don’t Mess With Samy Kamkar or USBdriveby

USBdriveby Samy Kamkar HackedBut if that’s not enough to sway you from fearing for your technology-based livelihood, maybe the fact that he can hack your computer in a matter of seconds will scare you. That’s right; Kamkar recently created a USB necklace called USBdriveby that plugs into your computer, takes over your keyboard and mouse and takes total control over your computer even after it’s unplugged.

In the video, he utilizes USBdriveby on an Apple computer, but Kamkar said it could easily be utilized on Windows of *nix. In seconds, USBdriveby disables Apple’s operating system firewall, breaks into your DNS settings and gives the hacker complete control. USBdriveby then opens a backdoor to a remote server so when it’s unplugged, remote controls can still be sent.

Oh, and it kindly makes you tea and closes any windows and settings it opened up along the way. I’m lying only about that first part.

“But I have Little Snitch running!” you might say, thinking that the network monitor app will save your computer before the device has any chance to compromise it. Well, that doesn’t matter. USBdriveby uses a series of keystrokes to tell Little Snitch to go back to bed; there’s nothing to see here.

Not only does Kamkar show how this works, he always shows how the code works. In all its terrifying glory, the USBdriveby code is shown piece-by-piece on how it leaves this trail of secret devastation.

Furthermore, Kamkar then takes the time to show off what USBdriveby is made of, allowing anybody to make one of their own at home. It costs only $20 to create, and slips around your neck in a concealing way so you may never be caught.

What does all this mean? Well, keep an eye on what your tech-savvy friends or enemies are wearing around their neck. Oh, and do yourself a favor now and smash your USB ports to pieces, because nothing is safe, yet again, thanks to Samy Kamkar.

Please note that does not advise smashing your USB port. Just be careful.

Images from Shutterstock.

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  • Thomas Wolf Tompkins

    Well if apple was not using a OS from 1998 they might have better security. Wont work on my Windows machine because I have the SHell Hardware Detection services disabled and removed.

  • Jay Jardin

    Stupid headline made me click. This is a mac issue for now.

  • rich godman

    This guy could make a mint raiding BTC wallets with ease.

  • Jad

    So, someone who has physical access to a computer with no one watching, can install malware? Wow. Never heard of THAT before. At least not when the USB stick was made into a necklace.