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Trading 101

Trading 101: 7 Trading Mistakes to Stop Making Right Now

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There are a lot of beginner mistakes when it comes to trading and investing. Almost everyone makes them, and for some it takes years to learn the lesson (those that are not serious about the game sometimes never learn it). If you are a beginning trader yourself, learning these lessons can potentially save you a lot of money and frustration on your journey to becoming a profitable trader.

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1. Trying to catch a falling knife 

Don’t buy something just because it has fallen a lot. You need to wait for confirmation from the market that the trend has changed. This confirmation should come in the form of price breaking through a moving average, an inverse head & shoulder pattern, or another move in the price that can easily and objectively be identified.

2. Holding on to positions that are annoying you

If have ever made a bad investment, you probably know how easy it is to hold on to your position despite it falling and falling. Your mind is telling you that it’s just about to turn around, and you promise yourself to sell as soon as you are break-even again… You are now on a sure path to getting eaten alive by better traders than you. The only way to deal with this problem is to ask yourself “would I have bought this position again now or would I rather spend the money on something else?” If the answer is “no, I would not buy it today,” get rid of your position immediately.

3. Buying on rumors or recommendations from friends 

It’s not difficult to find trading recommendations, we even publish them here on Hacked! Feel free to read them all and treat them as input when you are making your own trading decisions. After all, it’s your money on the line. You never know if the person giving you a recommendation is investing money himself or not. If you are going to follow someone else’s recommendations, you should also know their time frame, stop-loss, target price, and how much of total trading capital should be allocated to the trade.

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4. Being nervous about your trades

If you open positions in the market keep you up at night, you are either trading with too much capital or you are not confident enough in your trade. If the risk is keeping you up, reduce your trading size. If you are not confident about your trade, get rid of it and wait for a better opportunity.

5. Don’t focus on profit & loss

Being overly focused on profit and loss in terms of monetary value is a sure way to set the wrong stop-loss or miss an opportunity to ride a nice trend. Instead, look for levels in the chart such as supply and demand zones and observe the price action in those areas. Personally, I like to tighten my stop-loss when the price approaches such a level. That way, you will be able to continue riding the trend if price shoots through the level, and protect your downside if it doesn’t.

6. Hope is no trading strategy

If you’re telling yourself “I hope this one will skyrocket,” you are gambling, not trading. You would be better off taking a trip to the casino, which at least provides some entertainment value. You have to be able to say, “I expect this to skyrocket because…”

7. Panic is no trading strategy either

This one is more for longer-term investors. Whenever there is panic in the markets, you either need to sell very fast or chances are the market has already bottomed out. If you are a long-term investor, just as a trader, you should have a pre-determined plan for when to sell (or not sell at all) should panic erupt. That way, you know what to do when everyone else is panicking and chances are you will come out a whole lot wealthier than the rest of the crowd.

Featured image from Shutterstock.

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

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4.1 stars on average, based on 19 rated postsFredrik Vold is an entrepreneur, financial writer, and technical analysis enthusiast. He has been working and traveling in Asia for several years, and is currently based out of Beijing, China. He mainly follows the stock and forex markets, and is always looking for the next great alternative investment opportunity.




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Trading 101

How to Find Good Swing Trading Set-Ups

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swing trading

Swing trading is often the starting point for those who are looking to venture into trading, and perhaps make the move from being an investor to becoming an active trader. The reasons for this are simple; it involves trading on a medium timeframe which means it is possible to do it while you still have a day job, and it can complement other trading styles like day trading, trend trading, or scalping.

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According to Investopdia, typical holding time for a swing trader is 1-4 days. In forex, we would typically hold our trade for no more than 5 days in order to eliminate the risk of holding a position while the markets are closed over the weekend. For cryptocurrencies however, which trade 24/7, we can adapt our rules and we no longer need to be so strict about the holding period. In crypto, as long as the conditions for holding the trade are still valid, we should hold on to it.

What is a swing in a market?

The market price of a cryptocurrency can be defined as the equilibrium between supply and demand at any given time. It is the price where a buyer and a seller agree to make a trade. Over time, these equilibrium prices can move in uptrends or downtrends or even sideways in a range.

A typical market pattern is for prices to move from contracting ranges to expanding ranges. The shift between these two is called a “break-out,” and this is where we see strong and quick price movements to a new area on the chart.

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One way to look at it is to compare range contraction to a spring that is being compressed. The break-out occurs when all the energy from the spring is released, which may happen either to the upside or the downside. We now have the beginning of a “swing” in the market.

If this break-out is followed by a series of higher tops and higher bottoms in “wave movements,” the market has formed an uptrend. If the inverse is true, we have a downtrend. Each wave is considered its own swing in the market.

As swing traders, our job is to catch the most violent part of this move – the break-out. Some traders choose to hold on to the trade through several swings and thus ride the trend, while others prefer to sell once a pre-determined price target has been reached.

How to spot good potential swings?

For the majority of the time, prices of any tradable instrument move within a certain range. In the stock market, it is often said that the market is ranging as much as 80% of the time.

To scan for potential trading opportunities, one approach is to first look at your charts in one of the higher timeframes, for example the daily or the 4-hour timeframe. Once you spot a promising set-up, switch to a lower timeframe like the 1-hour to look for specific entry opportunities.

Generally speaking, there are three important factors you need to take into consideration when looking for an entry as a swing trader:

  1. Swings should happen in the same general direction as the trend that is playing out on the higher timeframes.
  2. If trading crypto, look for momentum in coins that share similar characteristics as the one you are trading. For example, if you are considering to trade a privacy-oriented coin like Dash, how are other privacy coins like Monero or Zcash doing? In the stock market, look for stocks in the same industry.
  3. Carefully evaluate the trend. Is it getting stronger or weaker? A weakening trend could mean that it is about to change direction, while a strengthening trend could mean the opposite. Is trading volume supporting the trend? Uptrends with gradually increasing volume are considered the most robust.

Timing and win rate

The best instrument to trade is the one that is exhibiting the strongest behavior in its class. So, to use the privacy coins as an example again, pick the one that is trending up in the strongest way among them. This is the coin where you want to place your trade.

In addition to this, don’t forget to adjust and tweak your strategy to the prevailing market conditions. Remember that the win rate of any trading strategy can change dramatically under changing market conditions, and make you go from being a profitable trader to a losing trader.

As swing traders, we need to be aggressive when we spot good opportunities. You cannot afford to pass on good trading opportunities. Make sure that you earn enough on your good trades to make up for the inevitable losses that will come.

Similarly, a swing trader also need to know when to stay away from the market altogether. It is equally important to recognize the conditions you should stay away from, as it is to be aggressive under the right conditions.

Lastly, remember the words of the legendary trader Jesse Livermore: “There is a time to go long, a time to go short, and a time to go fishing.” These are wise words that we all should remind ourselves of from time to time.

Good luck on your swing trading journey.

Featured image from Pixabay.

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

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4.1 stars on average, based on 19 rated postsFredrik Vold is an entrepreneur, financial writer, and technical analysis enthusiast. He has been working and traveling in Asia for several years, and is currently based out of Beijing, China. He mainly follows the stock and forex markets, and is always looking for the next great alternative investment opportunity.




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Jonas Borchgrevink

A New Trading Strategy? Using RSI and Stoch to find Entry Points

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I started my CFD Journey on Thursday using a few rules that I created for myself. I’m now interested in trying to see if I can use RSI and Stoch in combination to create an even better trading strategy for myself. My previous rules were:

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  1. Only risk max 2% of my bank roll per trade.
  2. Have 0 active positions during the night (first of all, I lose sleep, second; you are charged an interest fee for leaving a leveraged product overnight.)
  3. Always trade on last month’s trend including the previous day(s). If they do not correlate, I will not trade.
  4. If one position is lost, I’ll double the amount (martingale) and do a second trade. I’ll only stop doubling after 3 consecutive losses.
  5. Do not think about lost trade opportunities.
  6. Markets to trade: Dax & Dow (minimum spread).
  7. Stay updated on economic releases prior to entering a trade.
  8. Do not have emotional ties to the money. I like to call them “points”.

Trend following has proven (historically) to be the most sound way to trade any asset. It’s indisputable. However, for CFD trading I never want to leave a trade overnight due to interest fees and sleep. It can be hard to do trend following when you have to be in and out of a trade quick. I got an idea today to try and use RSI and Stoch in combination to find the best entry points for my CFD trading. And my ultimate strategy would be to include it with my number 3 rule:

Always trade on last month’s trend including the previous day(s). If they do not correlate, I will not trade.

In combination with my new RSI and Stoch rule:

Only enter a position when an asset is overbought or oversold shown by both RSI & Stoch at the same time.

What is RSI and Stoch?

The relative strength index (RSI) is a momentum indicator developed by noted technical analyst Welles Wilder, that compares the magnitude of recent gains and losses over a specified time period to measure speed and change of price movements of a security. It is primarily used to attempt to identify overbought or oversold conditions in the trading of an asset.

Many say that an asset with an RSI above 70 is overbought (and should be sold) or if the RSI is below 30 it’s oversold (and should be bought).

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The stochastic oscillator is a momentum indicator comparing the closing price of a security to the range of its prices over a certain period of time. The sensitivity of the oscillator to market movements is reducible by adjusting that time period or by taking a moving average of the result.

Asset with a stoch showing above 80 is considered overbought, and if the asset is showing less than 20 it’s considered oversold.

My mini experiment with the Dax 30 Minute Timeframe

Below is the first crossover I found where RSI and Stoch is correlating going back a few days on the Dax index. Both give a buy signal when the indicators cross their lowest horizontal lines. Then I found out that if I were to sell when either one of the indicators crosses the overbought territory I would be able to Take Profit.

Looking at the Dax index back to January 17th, I would have won six trades and lost two trades based on this strategy alone (RSI and Stoch with a 30 min timeframe). If I were to implement it with my trade following rule, I would have initiated 0 trades during this period (where both the intraday trend and the monthly trend is correlating.) I’m not sure if I’m going to follow these rules by the book, but I’m definitely going to experiment with them the following week and give you an update in my posts.

Have you tried this before? Submit a comment below and let me know how it worked for you.

My trading rules are now updated to:

  1. Only risk max 2% of my bank roll per trade.
  2. Have 0 active positions during the night (first of all, I lose sleep, second; you are charged an interest fee for leaving a leveraged product overnight.)
  3. Always trade on last month’s trend including the previous day(s). If they do not correlate, I will not trade.
  4. If one position is lost, I’ll double the amount (martingale) and do a second trade. I’ll only stop doubling after 3 consecutive losses.
  5. Do not think about lost trade opportunities.
  6. Markets to trade: Dax & Dow (minimum spread).
  7. Stay updated on economic releases prior to entering a trade.
  8. Do not have emotional ties to the money. I like to call them “points”.
  9. Only enter a position when an asset is overbought or oversold shown by both RSI & Stoch at the same time.
Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

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Education

Trading 101: What is the Best Trading Software?

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Trading software

As we all know, any kind of professional activity requires its own set of tools and equipment. Trading is no exception to this. It is also true that the more demanding your use is, the more expensive the required equipment tends to get. Still, when compared to other jobs you could take up, the equipment required to trade, whether it is in crypto, stocks, or forex, is quite cheap.

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You have wide options available when it comes to choosing a platform to trade on. Cryptocurrency traders usually use an exchange with its own decent web-based trading interface, thus reducing the need for other platforms that forex and stock traders have traditionally used.

Many cryptocurrency traders instead opt to do their charting on a separate platform, and then place their orders directly on the exchange. In fact, separating trading and charting is a good practice that I usually recommend because it keeps you from making impulse trades when you are doing your analysis. If you instead do your analysis on a separate platform, and then need to log in to your broker to place the trade, chances are you will have time to reflect over what you are doing and thus reduce the likelihood of making mistakes.

Trading software packages also vary widely in price, from free basic packages to extremely expensive options designed for institutions. In this article, I will cover two of the most popular platforms for retail traders that are available for a relatively low cost.

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TradingView

Perhaps the most popular charting software for technical analysis right now is TradingView. This platform has earned the top spot over the past few years for very good reason, with the main one being its social experience.

TradingView lets users publish their own trade ideas for the rest of the community to see and rate. Ideas are usually based on technical analysis, and are drawn directly on the charts using the built-in tools for technical analysis.

While TradingView used to be a community mainly consisting of forex traders, a huge number of cryptocurrency traders have also come to the platform over the past year. The charting tool now supports a large selection of cryptocurrency trading pairs, and their “Cryptocurrencies” chat has become one of the most popular chats on the platform.

Lots of technical analysis enthusiasts will claim that TradingView is simply the best charting platform available today. It is simple enough for beginners to understand, while at the same offers all of the features an advanced trader would ever ask for.

You can start using TradingView for free today, and choose to upgrade to one of their paid plans later once you become comfortable with the platform. Although their prices have increased over the past few years, TradingView is still reasonably priced considering how powerful the platform is.

TradingView has the following subscription plans (month-to-month subscriptions):

  • FREE
  • PRO: US$14.95/month
  • PRO+: US$29.95/month
  • PREMIUM: US$59.95/month

All plans offer better prices if you opt for a 2-year subscription period. Personally, I feel that their PRO+ plan offers the most bang for the buck.

MetaTrader

While TradingView is a web-based platform that runs directly in your browser, MetaTrader is a more traditional kind of trading software that you need to download on your computer. Originally built by Russian company MetaQuotes Software, MetaTrader is by far the most popular trading software for retail forex and CFD traders in the world.

We have previously talked about how you can profit from having robots trade for you, and this is probably what the MetaTrader platform has become best known for. You have the option of tracking the trades of a free robot, or paying for access to a (presumably) better one. You can also track the trades made by other human traders in the same way, also known as copy-trading.

MetaTrader users can also put their coding skills to work and develop their own trading robots or custom technical indicators. The end result of your work can either be used by yourself or sold to other users on the built-in marketplace.

As a new trader, it is really important that you don’t blindly buy into the promises of trading robots you come across, and that you are aware of their limitations. As Jonas explained in his recent article, oftentimes these robots will perform fantastic for a short amount of time before they eventually fail miserably, causing you to lose all the money you initially gained. Trading robots are sometimes optimized to perform perfectly in past market conditions, but that does not necessarily mean that they will perform equally well in the future. This is one of the big pitfalls of algorithmic trading, often referred to by traders as “curve-fitting” or “over-optimization.”

Lastly, there is no doubt that MetaTrader has a more advanced feel to it than TradingView, and it is also more complicated to learn how to use it. That alone, however, does not mean that it is a better platform to use.

MetaTrader or TradingView – which one should you go for?

Perhaps the best way to approach this is to think of MetaTrader and TradingView as complements of each other. You could for example use TradingView solely as a technical analysis tool and a social network for staying in touch with other traders, while placing your trades in MetaTrader (if your broker supports that platform).

Many traders who used to be hardcore supporters of MetaTrader have switched to TradingView, at least for their charting work. The most obvious reason for doing that is probably that TradingView runs in the cloud, and therefore automatically backs up everything you do on the platform. If your computer breaks down while using TradingView, you can simply get a new one and continue where you left off. With MetaTrader however, everything is saved locally on your hard drive, meaning everything you have done will be lost when your computer crashes.

For those active in the forex market, most brokers will offer their own web-based trading platform in addition to the MetaTrader platform. I would recommend starting with the web-based solution to learn the game at first. MetaTrader may feel overwhelming to start with, and there is no need to make things more difficult than they already are.

Once you have gained more confidence in the markets, you can try out MetaTrader if you feel the need for more advanced functionality or want to test out trading robots. If you instead prefer to do your own technical analysis, TradingView has you covered with pretty much everything you will ever need. By doing it this way and taking things one step at a time, your learning curve will become more manageable and your odds of success greatly improved.

Featured image from Pixabay.

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

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4.1 stars on average, based on 19 rated postsFredrik Vold is an entrepreneur, financial writer, and technical analysis enthusiast. He has been working and traveling in Asia for several years, and is currently based out of Beijing, China. He mainly follows the stock and forex markets, and is always looking for the next great alternative investment opportunity.




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