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Mark Zuckerberg Supports Apple’s Stance on Encryption

Mark Zuckerberg Supports Apple’s Stance on Encryption

by Samburaj DasFebruary 22, 2016

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has weighed in on the encryption debate engulfing Apple, the US Government and the FBI in recent weeks by backing Apple in its unrelenting pro-encryption stance.

Speaking at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona today, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg publicly stated his support for Apple in the technology company’s public stand-off with the FBI over breaking encryption on a terrorist’s phone.

In comments reported by USA Today, Zuckerberg stated:

We’re sympathetic with Apple. We believe in encryption; we think that that’s an important tool.

Zuckerberg further added that building backdoors aren’t the way to go in combating terrorism while stating that Facebook has a “pretty big responsibility” to help governments and law enforcement agencies combat and “prevent terrorism and different kinds of attacks.”

About Facebook’s own policies about content promoting or condoning terrorism, he stated:

We certainly do have very strong policies on this. If there is any content that is promoting terrorism or sympathizing with ISIS, we’ll take that off the service.

We don’t want people doing that kind of stuff on Facebook. If we have opportunities to basically work with governments and folks to make sure that there aren’t terrorist attacks then we’re going to take those opportunities and we feel a pretty strong responsibility to help make sure that society is safe. We care about that. That’s a pretty big deal. We take that seriously.

Zuckerberg’s comments mirror those of Google CEO Sundaram Pichai who also supported Apple and its CEO Tim Cook’s public stance of encryption.

In a series of tweets, Pichai stated that users’ privacy could be compromised if companies are ‘forced’ to create backdoors or break encryption for their own products. He further added that the hacking of customer devices by the companies who make the very same products could set a “troubling precedent.”

Featured image from Shutterstock.

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