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Lizard Squad Suspect Arrested in Southport, United Kingdom

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With Lizard Squad‘s brazen tactics to raise Twitter followers and eventually come into possession of 3000 lifetime accounts on Kim Dotcom‘s encrypted file-sharing service, Mega, one could assume the group was for some reason untouchable. After all, the Christmas Day attack was announced a month or more in advance, and nothing was done to stop or prevent it.

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Lizard Squad Suspect Arrest

Now, not a month following the rude boy vandalism and wanton arrogance that was the Christmas Day attack, an arrest has been made in Southport, UK. In custody is a yet-unnamed 18-year-old man police say was involved in at least the DDoS attacks on the PlayStation and XBOX networks.

The arrest was made this morning on seemingly quiet Boundary Street in Southport, England, UK. The UK law which authorizes this arrest is the Computer Misuse Act of 1990, Section 1. The law enforcement agency responsible for the arrest was the South East Regional Organised Crime Unit (SEROCU) Cyber Crime Unit in conjunction with information from the FBI. The arrest was big news in the town of roughly 70,000 in the County of Merseyside.

Also read: Zombie CISPA Follows Lizard Squad

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Reasonable Doubt

lizard squad stumpThe thing about DDoS attacks is they are rarely conducted from the attacker’s actual computer. Most often, a “botnet,” or series of computers which the attacker has gained control of, are used to conduct such attacks.

While the government is also charging the young man with being involved with at least one “swatting,” the act of getting a serious police presence called to someone’s home address and basically ruining their life for a time, it will be interesting to see the evidence come to light in the case. Your trusted journalists at Hacked will be on the case until its resolution.

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Artificial Intelligence

Students Create Doom AI Which Learns Visually and Kills Humans in Deathmatch

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Two students from Carnegie Mellon University recently placed second in an artificial intelligence competition for their submission of a program that was able to learn the game Doom the same way humans do – by playing.

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Communication

Sony Introduces 2FA for PlayStation Users

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In a long-awaited and overdue move, Sony has finally introduced two-factor authentication to PlayStation users who can now enable the security feature on their PlayStation Network (PSN) accounts.

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Five years after suffering a devastating hack that compromised the user details of some 77 million PlayStation Network users, Sony has introduced two-factor authentication (2FA) on PSN accounts. Sony confirmed the news with a tweet last night, explaining how the feature works.

“By requiring two forms of identification for sign-in, your account and personal information will be better protected.” Sony wrote in its blog.

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Users will be asked to provide a verification code that will be texted to their mobile phones at the time of signing into their PSN account. While the feature isn’t hack-proof (nothing is, really), it provides a much-needed extra layer of protection that a large platform like the PlayStation Network, with over 100 million uses, deserves.

Sony PS 2FA

Sony added:

Passwords can be compromised if you use the same password for multiple accounts, click on malicious links, open phishing emails and other methods.

If your password is compromised and becomes known to someone other than yourself, your account will still require a verification code to gain access when you activate 2-Step Verification.

With the feature, Sony caught up with its console rival Microsoft. The Redmond-based software giant had introduced 2FA for Xbox back in 2013, during the days of Xbox 360. Other platforms which sees millions of users such as Google, Apple, Facebook, Twitter and others have been offering 2FA security for years.

It is perhaps baffling that Sony took as long as it did to introduce 2FA security, after the 2011 breach. At the time, the hack had Sony admitting that names, email addresses, billing addresses, account passwords and some credit card numbers were all exposed. The fallout saw Sony fined by the UK government. Furthermore, Sony also agreed to a settlement in a class action lawsuit, worth millions, granting PSN users in the United States the means to claim damages if they suffered identity theft as a result of the data breach.

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Fun Hacks

British Whizz Kid Hacks Pokemon Go; Catches Monsters Without Breaking a Sweat

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Pokemon Go

A 25-year-old British former computer science student has discovered a loophole in the popular Pokemon Go allowing him to catch Pokemon without leaving the comfort of his home.

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According to reports, players of the game have resorted to donating thousands of pounds to keep Mark Gore’s ‘bot’ running. Five lawyers are alleged to have urged him to remove the programme.

Mr Gore has stated that his loophole wasn’t designed to take the fun out of the game, which is reported to have seen users harassed by police for walking into restricted areas, according to the British tabloid newspaper, the Sun.

He stated that it was easy exploiting the game, which was created by Niantic. Gore said that over 24,000 people worldwide had been using his site to take advantage of his ‘bot’.

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He said:

I don’t think I’m spoiling people’s fun. If you look at the age bracket of people playing this game, it’s not all teenagers playing. There are a lot of people who work all day and don’t have the time to spend hours each day going out and catching Pokemon.

He added that those who want to can run the program in the comfort of their own home for two hours a day and still maintain the same level of fun to those who walk around collecting Pokemon.

While it certainly adds a level of safety to the game, does it not take away the authentic feel of it too?

Featured image from Matthew Corley via Shutterstock.

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