Connect with us

Law

Iceland’s Pirate Party is now the Largest Party According to a New Poll

Published

on

iceland capital

Iceland’s Captial Reykjavik

// -- Discuss and ask questions in our community on Workplace.

Politics is serious business. It’s not meant to be messed with by the young and idealistic. In fact, most countries have age restrictions so that you must be old and “realistic” by the time you ever get to the seat of power. But now and then there come political ideas so uniting that everyone must get in on them somehow. Internet freedom is one thing that all people, of all stripes, tend to agree on to some extent.

The exact extent can be a fine line, which has led some in Europe to found the Pirate Party, which is very much rooted in the truism: information wants to be free. Founded in 2006 by Swedish IT entrepreneur Rick Falkvinge, the pirate party movement has spread worldwide. Its original incarnation has had but rare and fleeting success, unable to even secure proper pardons for the founding members of the Pirate Bay, perhaps the most successful torrent sharing website the world will ever see, which exists to this day in jurisdictions where it is not literally outlawed.

Elsewhere, though, the pirate party movement is seeing more and more traction, particularly in Iceland. As other outlets have noted, Iceland is traditionally a more right-leaning, conservative type of country, wherein things like social liberties are less important than laissez-faire capitalism. In 2009, the relatively tiny country of less than 400,000 was particularly hard-hit by the global financial crisis, and in turn elected a left-wing ticket for basically the first time in modern history. Then, as happens in many political systems, the traditionally reigning powers regained control by a wide margin, the populace things had gone back to normal.

// -- Become a yearly Platinum Member and save 69 USD and get access to our secret group on Workplace. Click here to change your current membership -- //

Pirate Party Iceland Gaining Ground

But the plot thickens further, matey! (Sorry.) In just the last few months, for on-the-surface inexplicable reasons, the Pirate Party of Iceland has been gaining and gaining in informal, non-voting-oriented polls. The tiny party of just three (currently) elected members has surged above a split-hair rest of the competition, now having nearly 35% of the population’s approval. The Pirate Party does not stick to traditional party parallels, that is, it focuses on issues which directly relate to the freedom of citizens as regards the Internet and other day-to-day nuances.

The Pirate Party of Iceland did make a few headlines almost two years ago, though, by proposing that Edward Snowden be granted immediate citizenship. The bill didn’t go far, but it is demonstrative of the kinds of policies they’re in favor of, and the kind of politics they’re willing to espouse.

Since then, the reigning triumvirate has had time alienate much of its base, erstwhile a new crop of young, highly enlightened voters have come to the fore. Could the future of Iceland be piratic in nature, becoming a zone of (protected) digital freedom people cannot experience elsewhere? What other changes come about when a pirate party comes to power? One can only hope that Iceland may actually give us a chance to find out in 2017.

Images from Shutterstock.

Important: Never invest money you can't afford to lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here.



Feedback or Requests?

Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Bitcoin

Digital Fraud & How to protect Yourself: From ICOs to Bitcoin Scams

Published

on

Digital fraud continues to grow apace. More worryingly, the increasing variety and sophistication of the scams themselves has seen the number of people falling victim to scams growing just as fast. And we are no longer just talking about standard phishing. Today’s digital criminals are highly developed and extremely quick to jump on the latest online trends to take full advantage of every opportunity.

// -- Discuss and ask questions in our community on Workplace.

As dispute resolution specialists we are often the first port of call for clients who have found themselves in particularly difficult situations. Unsurprisingly more and more of these situations involve digital fraud and we wanted to use this opportunity to outline some of the fastest growing and most regular scams and offer a little advice as to how you can separate scams from genuine opportunities.

1. Binary options (also known as all-or-nothing options, digital options and fixed return options) trading

A binary option is basically a financial option in which the pay-off is either a fixed monetary amount or nothing at all. There are two types of binary option:

§ A ‘cash-or-nothing’ option which will pay a fixed amount of cash if the option expires in profit

// -- Become a yearly Platinum Member and save 69 USD and get access to our secret group on Workplace. Click here to change your current membership -- //

§ An ‘asset-or-nothing’ option which will pay the value of the underlying security

It is the ‘or nothing’ that’s attracted fraudsters and there are now hundreds of trading platforms operating outside the regulated financial markets.

The scam is simple. A fake company owns a website that makes them look like a legitimate binary options broker and offers users access to a ‘live’ trading environment whilst promising accuracy, transparency and guarantees designed to settle the nerves of a would be investor. The investor then makes an initial deposit which they will see grow online at which point they’ll be asked to deposit more.

Eventually, despite the appearance of healthy growth, the website will suddenly fold taking all of your deposits with it. Alternatively if you have asked to withdraw your investment, you may be asked to top up your account to take your balance to the minimum required to make a withdrawal … at which point the website will fold taking all of your deposits with it.

If you fall victim to a binary options scam, resolution can be tricky. As these are fake companies, it’s very hard to find out who the owners are never mind begin the process of recovering your money. Waters are muddied further by the fact they will most likely be operating outside the UK (Israel has the dubious honour of housing the majority of these fraudsters) and operating in an area with little or no regulatory environment.

2. Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs)

The easiest way to explain it is that it’s a type of crowdfunding that has grown out of the current growth in popularity of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. However instead of providing a shareholding in return for an injection of capital, the company seeking investment will release a fixed number of its own crypto-tokens then sell those tokens to investors. Usually the investors will pay for these tokens in Bitcoin but some will accept the major international currencies.

There is a common misconception that an ICO is the same as an IPO (an Initial Public Offering) but there are actually two major differences:

§ In an IPO the shares purchased by an investor are representative of their voting power and their level of ownership. This isn’t always the case with an ICO and just having the company’s cryptocurrency doesn’t guarantee voting or management rights; they are just something to be exchanged for other currencies at a later date.

§ As IPOs are an integral part of the world’s trading exchanges, they are heavily regulated. As cryptocurrency crowdfunding is new it does not yet enjoy the same protection which means any involvement carries as much risk as opportunity for an investor.

As this is still a developing area and an area that’s creating a bit of a buzz in the tech market, digital fraudsters have been quick to take note and fake investment opportunities are springing up at an increasing rate. Experience of resolving disputes after the fact has taught us a few lessons as to how to tell a real opportunity from a scam so if you are attracted by an ICO we would urge you to:

§ Make sure your investment will provide all of the ownership and voting rights you want

§ Understand the risks and if you are uncomfortable making a significant investment via a platform that sits outside the usual market regulations, this may not be for you

§ Do your due diligence and make sure the company offering the ICO is a going concern, has a recognised legal entity and that the project you want to invest in has the required research and staffing behind it

§ Make sure any investment you make will be is deposited into an escrow wallet and that at least one of the keys to that wallet is held by a trusted third party

§ Ensure you have a complete and professionally drafted set of legal terms and conditions signed both by you and by the company you are investing in

§ Ask around or search the internet in case no one has ever heard of the company launching or there is no record anywhere of the company and/or the entrepreneurs behind it

§ Ask to see both the business plan and a record of any work-in-progress (WIP); a negative or evasive response should be treated as a red flag

3. Bitcoin scams

Having hit its highest ever price, Bitcoin is currently in greater demand than it has ever been which means criminals have never been as active in finding different ways to exploit it for their own gain.

As it is so attractive the range of Bitcoin scams has grown almost impinged and the rise and rise of social media has provided the perfect platform for scammers to promote every variation. The list of scams we have come into contact with includes:

§ Malware downloads

Hugely attractive Bitcoin transactions are used to persuade you to download damaging software designed to damage or gain access to your computer.

§ Bitcoin phishing ‘impersonators’

Criminals use the Bitcoin logo to gain a victim’s trust then, once that trust is established, a phishing website entices users to enter their private Bitcoin key to check it exists in their database then the key is then phished and the associated account is emptied.

§ Bitcoin-flipping

After you pay a joining fee to exchange bitcoins and double any investment you make within a very short time-frame you find your bitcoins have been simply stolen.

§ Bitcoin pyramid schemes (also known as Multi-Level Marketing or MLM Schemes)

A high level of return is promised for a low level investment but the size of the return is linked to you sending the links to your friends to get them to join too. However once a few hundred people have signed up paid the joining fee, the scheme folds.

§ Fake Cloud Mining Services

Bitcoin “miners” validate transactions in the blockchain using complicated mathematical equations in exchange for new bitcoins. Scammers promise the same service then collect the ‘mining fees’ without actually doing any mining. Initially they will probably pay out a few small amounts but these soon dry up as the scammer disappears with the funds.

§ Bitcoin Investment Schemes

Again these scams promise high levels of return in return for providing low levels of capital for ‘investors’ who purport to trade digital currency. Like cloud mining scams they tend to pay out a few small returns then the payments stop and the scammer absconds with everything their victims have invested.

§ Fake Exchange Scams

Bitcoin exchanges (marketplaces that trade Bitcoin for traditional currency or other cryptocurrencies) are legitimate but fake exchanges are springing up every day. The fake exchanges will ask users to deposit funds to purchase Bitcoin whilst enjoying lower transaction fees than regular exchanges. The only thing is as these exchanges aren’t real, they never realise the promised return.

§ Bitcoin Donation Scams

In the wake of recent events, this is without doubt the most cynical type of scam. More and more scammers are creating fake donation pages asking people to donate in bitcoin rather than via better policed platforms like PayPal.

So how do you protect yourself? With all of these scams there is a basic rule, if it looks too good to be true, it probably is. If someone sends you a hugely attractive offer out of the blue, you need to immediately be on your guard.

Here are 4 basic rules we would urge you to follow:

§ Never trust any unsolicited email or social media post

§ Never click on any associated URL however high the potential return is claimed to be unless you know and trust the sender (and remember it’s now easy to replicate a social media account)

§ Never engage with or provide personal information in response to an email or social media account until you have checked to make sure the sender is 100% genuine.

§ Never enter into any type of financial transaction on the back of an email or a direct message on social media until you have completed all off your due diligence.

And if you do fall victim never try to resolve the situation on your own.

These may be criminals but they are highly sophisticated criminals and will be hidden behind layers of cleverly created camouflage. Always engage an experienced lawyer with a proven success record in resolving cross-border multi-jurisdictional disputes involving digital fraud. If you are going to recover lost funds, putting the right strategy in place immediately will be key to your success.

Important: Never invest money you can't afford to lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here.



Feedback or Requests?

Continue Reading

Law

A Judge Has Approved a Lawsuit to be Served via Twitter

Published

on

Non-profit St. Francis of Assisi has been prosecuting a lawsuit on behalf of the estates and families of Assyrian Christians were murdered and had their property destroyed as a result of ISIS/ISIL/Islamic State activities in the middle east. The group is suing Kuwait Finance House, Kuveyt-Turk Participation Bank Inc., and a man named Hajjaj al-Ajmi for having financed the terrorist groups, but has had trouble serving papers on al-Ajmi.

// -- Discuss and ask questions in our community on Workplace.

The plaintiffs noticed that al-Ajmi has an active Twitter account and asked a federal court to allow them to serve the papers that way. US Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler assented to this request, saying in a ruling:

The court grants St. Francis’s request because service via Twitter is reasonably calculated to give notice and is not prohibited by international agreement.

Also a Twitter Rebel

Hajjaj al-Ajmi was kicked off Twitter in 2014 following a Treasury Department sanction. However, in May of this year he created at least one new account, and currently has over 100,000 followers. At the time, al-Ajmi was actively raising funds for Islamic State efforts, even posting phone numbers for people to call and make donations through. Archived tweets and news coverage would provide ample evidence in a case against him.

4-al-ajmi-tweet

// -- Become a yearly Platinum Member and save 69 USD and get access to our secret group on Workplace. Click here to change your current membership -- //

The St. Francis of Assisi is acting specifically on behalf of Christian victims of the Islamic State. Al-Ajmi’s status as a banned transactor by the Treasury Department, his history of being kicked off social media platforms for terrorist activities, and his general repertoire of anti-Christian, extremist Islam make him a ripe target for the proceedings. The other parties named in the suit have already been served by traditional means.

Not a First

The ruling notes that other cases in the past have allowed for the use of social media as an alternative means of serving papers. It noted the case of a trademark infringement suit against a Turkish citizen who could not be located. In that case, the court authorized e-mail, Facebook, and LinkedIn to be used. In a scam artistry case in which the Federal Trade Commission could not reach the alleged scam artists and could not get help from the Indian government, a federal court gave them permission to use the Facebook accounts of the parties named.

Probably Not a Normal Thing

Don’t worry, though. If you’re named in a lawsuit and you’re reachable by traditional methods, most likely you’re still going to be served in the traditional ways. One can imagine a future where frustrated process servers push for legislation to allow for the regular serving of papers via social media, and such an explicit law could conceivably make this ordeal the norm, but in all three of the largely known cases where this has happened, the plaintiffs had to get special permission from the court before considering social media serving to be in line with due process.

Important: Never invest money you can't afford to lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here.



Feedback or Requests?

Continue Reading

Communication

San Bernadino iPhone Case: Major Press Agencies Are Suing the FBI

Published

on

The Associated Press, Gannett, and VICE Media are suing the FBI to know more details about the agency’s hack of the San Bernadino killer’s iPhone.

// -- Discuss and ask questions in our community on Workplace.

(more…)

Important: Never invest money you can't afford to lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here.



Feedback or Requests?

Continue Reading

Trending