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Hillary Clinton Campaign Official: Email Leak a Russian Ploy to Help Trump

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In an interview on Sunday, Hillary Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook opined that Russian state-sponsored hackers may have hacked the Democratic Party’s network and email system in order to help Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

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A top Hillary Clinton official has made the stunning claim that Russian state-sponsored hackers hacked the Democratic National Convention’s (DNC) email network, now being leaked by WikiLeaks in order to help presidential seat rival and Republican nominee Donald Trump.

Hillary Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook, speaking to CNN, stated:

What’s disturbing to us is that experts are telling us that Russian state actors broke into the DNC, stole these emails…other experts are now saying that the Russians are releasing these emails for the purpose of actually helping Donald Trump…That’s disturbing.

The alleged emails were leaked by WikiLeaks last week and revealed that DNC officials were actively looking at ways to support Clinton during the primaries when Bernie Sanders was also in the running, rather than remaining neutral with the candidates.

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Paul Manafort, Trump’s campaign chairman brushed off the claims as “obfuscation” by the Clinton campaign. Speaking on ABC, he called such claims “absurd” while adding:

What they don’t want to talk about is what’s in those emails. What’s in those emails show it was a clearly rigged system. Bernie Sanders never had a chance.

The claim, however, saw some cybersecurity experts backing it up. CrowdStrike, the forensic firm investigating the DNC breach said that the recently published emails from WikiLeaks are likely to have been provided to the whistleblowing group by state-sponsored Russian hackers.

In an interview with the Washington Post, Thomas Rid, a professor at King’s College in London revealed that he had communicated with Guccifer2, the hacker who claimed responsibility for the DNS breach.

The tactic of using hackers to influence politics would be a “game-changer”, according to Rid.

Cyber-intelligence software firm ThreatConnect conducted its own analysis and believe that Guccifer2 is linked to a Russian cyberespionage campaign.

Richard Barger, chief information officer at the firm stated:

We’ve been looking at this very closely, from both the technical and non-technical spheres. Based on our analysis, we strongly feel Guccifer2 is linked to a Russian information operations campaign and is not the independent Russian hacker that he claims to be.

Guccifer2, or Guccifer 2.0, is the moniker assumed by a hacker in a nod to the original Guccifer, a Romanian hacker who breached and leaked emails belonging to Hillary Clinton. Guccifer was extradited to the United States earlier this year and later claimed in an interview that hacking her emails was “easy.”

Meanwhile, Russia has repeatedly stated that it has not been involved in any part of the entire episode.

Speaking to Reuters, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said:

I completely rule out a possibility that the government or the government bodies have been involved in this.

 Featured image from Shutterstock.

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Samburaj is the contributing editor at Hacked and keeps tabs on science, technology and cyber security.




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  1. Codeseven

    July 25, 2016 at 9:04 am

    This is such a joke. You have the GOP, the Bernie Sandera supporters, people in congress, multiple other branches of the government, and now other countries all trying to rid Clinton of the presidency, but the big media companies who will profit from her presidency are all trying to make it seem like some ploy for Trump, trying to keep the “us vs them” image alive so everyone will continue to see Hillary as the shining star that will “deliver us from Trump”……

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Cybersecurity

Israeli Researchers Turn Speakers/Headphones Into Eavesdropping Microphones

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In the current age, even the most secure software and the best security practices might not be enough to prevent someone from being spied upon. Researchers continue to find novel and inventive ways to gather more data on everyday computer users, and the latest research from Israel’s Ben Gurion University is exceptional in this regard.

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Using software alone, Mordechai Guri, Yosef Solewicz, Andrey Daidakulov, and Yuval Elovici were able to convert a given pair of headphones or speakers into Orwellian microphones beyond the user’s control or ability to patch. Their method [PDF] exploits a flaw in RealTek hardware chips, which are one of the most widely used chips in motherboards around the world. Companies like Dell, HP, and Compaq regularly utilize RealTek’s industry standard audio chips in their products. Beyond that, motherboards sold to consumers wishing to build their own systems often also include the hardware.

A simple patch or firmware upgrade will not fix this flaw, making the exploit particularly delightful to intelligence agencies, profit-motivated hackers (think boardroom conference calls), and others. Basically, anywhere a computer has an audio output, which in the case of laptops is everywhere, audio can now be intercepted and then relayed with roughly the same quality as if a microphone itself had been compromised. The images of people like Mark Zuckerberg covering up their webcam and microphone with electrical tape now seem trivial.

Jack re-tasking – the process of converting an output jack to either an input or a two-way port – has long been a possibility, but few developers make use of it. Most laptops and desktops will have separate ports for each, while smartphones and the like often require hardware that can do both. But the innovation on the part of Ben Gurion’s researchers involves making any regular output hardware capable of doing as much with only software. They write:

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The fact that headphones and earphones are physically built like microphones, coupled with the fact that an audio port’s role in the PC can be altered programmatically from output to input, creates a vulnerability which can be abused by hackers.

The researchers noticed that the design of most audio input and output hardware was basically identical at the metal, drawing the following illustration for clarification:

Source: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center

Source: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center

One saving grace is that the audio output device must be “passive,” or unpowered. This means that if your speakers require power to work, they are not currently able to use these to listen to you. However, the vast majority of laptop speakers and earbuds are, by nature and necessity, passive. The researchers note that while they focused on RealTek codec hardware because of their popularity, other manufacturers also have the ability to retask jacks, which is the heart of the exploit.

While this may seem scary at first, it should be noted that, like anything else on your computer, audio input and output are data. They can therefore be encrypted with keys that are local to the machine, and it would seem that this new exploit opens up a new avenue of research for cryptographic researchers to institute audio encryption in the same way that full-disk encryption has become normalized.

Here is a demonstration of the method in action:

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5 stars on average, based on 1 rated postsP. H. Madore has covered the cryptocurrency beat over the course of hundreds of articles for Hacked's sister site, CryptoCoinsNews, as well as some of her competitors. He is a major contributing developer to the Woodcoin project, and has made technical contributions on a number of other cryptocurrency projects. In spare time, he recently began a more personalized, weekly newsletter at http://ico.phm.link




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Cyberespionage

Apple Watches Banned from UK Cabinet Meetings for Hacking Fears

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Cabinet ministers have voiced concerns that Apple Watches could be hacked by Russian spies, prompting the devices to be barred from meetings, according to a report from The Telegraph.

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Under the new leadership of Theresa May, U.K cabinet ministers have been barred from wearing the watch during meetings after concerns were raised that the gadgets could be employed as listening devices.

The Apple Watches join the list of banned items alongside mobile phones after these were barred for similar reasons.

According to a survey conducted by research firm IDC, Apple Watches account for seven percent of the market compared to FitBit, which is reported to account for 25.4 percent.

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A Threat from Russian Hackers

This latest news comes amid concerns of a possible threat from Russian hackers who have recently been in the news.

Russian hackers are alleged to have been able to obtain confidential emails from the Democratic National Congress during the U.S. elections despite Russian president, Vladimir Putin, denying this was the case. Surprisingly, congressional leaders are reported to have known about the hacking a year before it was officially announced.

Not only that, but at the recent Rio Olympics, which saw many Russian athletes banned from competing after it was revealed that there was a state-run doping program in the country, Russian hackers have retaliated.

A Russian cyberespionage group known as Fancy Bear recently accessed and leaked data from several high-profile Olympic athletes, by targeting a World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) database. This is the same agency that placed a recommendation to ban all Russian athletes from the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Unsurprisingly, with the threat of Russian hackers high, and with devices such as mobile phones and watches now being considered as vulnerable gadgets that can be hacked into, it seems as though banning them from important meetings is the only way that will remove any possible threat to state security.

Featured image from Shutterstock.

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

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Cybersecurity

In Child Porn Bust, FBI May Have Used Malware on Innocent Users

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In 2013, the FBI confiscated Freedom Hosting, a service that hosted websites on the dark web, including several child pornography websites and private email service TorMail. When it happened, it was seen as a massive victory, but recently unsealed documents show the FBI may have used malware on innocent users.

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Three years ago, the FBI was given a warrant that allowed them to hack 300 TorMail users who were allegedly linked to child pornography. They went with a piece of malware known as a Network Investigative Technique (NIT), with the goal of acquiring users’ real IP addresses.

The agency did manage to arrest a lot of people for child pornography, but documents unsealed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) show the NIT was actually used on innocent users.

According to the documents, the FBI was allowed to “investigate any user who logs into any of the TARGET ACCOUNTS by entering a username and password”. Yet, the NIT was used on users even before the TorMail login page appeared. WIRED’s coverage at the time claims users were given a “Down for Maintenance” page that carried the malware, on al websites hosted by Freedom Hosting.

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Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist at the ACLU told told Motherboard:

While the warrant authorized hacking with a scalpel, the FBI delivered their malware to TorMail users with a grenade

The malware was quickly discovered by the community, and that forced the Feds to end their operation sooner than expected. Be that as it may, the FBI still arrested a large number of child pornographers.

Christopher Soghoian also noted that it remains unclear whether the court knew the FBI hacked innocent users it shouldn’t have, and whether the agents who did it were punished.

How the Feds Caught the Pedophiles

Although the Feds allegedly hacked innocent users, they still got the job done, as their malware exploited a critical memory management vulnerability in Firefox, which later fixed the problem.

The NIT specifically targeted Tor’s Firefox version, through a hidden Windows executable named “Magneto”. All it did was look up the infected user’s MAC address – a unique hardware identifier – and the Windows hostname. Then it was all sent to a server in Virginia outside of Tor, exposing the user’s real IP address.

Magneto also sent a serial number that tied the victim to her visit to the hacked websites. Those who noticed the hidden iframe tag that loaded the JavaScript code, noticed a lot of work went into simply identifying users, so the Feds became a suspect.

Still, after identifying users’ real IP addresses, their anonymity was broken. Thus, child pornographers were taken down.

Image from Shutterstock.

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

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