Connect with us

Law

Columbia House Lawyer Fail: “Pixels”

Published

on

vimeo-old-logo-official-copyright-vimeoAn intellectual property-focused law firm representing Columbia Pictures has gone berserk, filing a torrent of copyright takedown requests against popular video-hosting platform Vimeo in targeting independent firms and videos with the word ‘pixels’ in the title.

Anti-piracy firm Entura International has served Vimeo with a significant number of takedown notices targeting the takedown of a number of videos that contain the word “pixels” in the title, TorrentFreak reports.

The anti-piracy firm filed a DMCA complaint lodged against popular video-hosting platform Vimeo, in representing Columbia Pictures, the major Hollywood studio behind the film “Pixels.”

Common Sense, Discarded

While Columbia Pictures has every right to protect its property, the actions of the anti-piracy firm representing the studio have predominantly backfired in its efforts to curb piracy. Instead, the takedown notices have only served to inconvenience independent filmmakers.

For instance, a non-profit NGO (Non-government organization) called NeMe was one of the many victims in the scatter-fire approach used by the anti-privacy firm.

“Our NGO has just received a DMCA notice for a video we produced in 2006 entitled ‘Pixels’,” the organization said in a post on Vimeo forums after the takedown.

“The video was directed by a Cypriot filmmaker using his own photos and sounds/music on a shoestring budget and infringes no copyright.”

In response, Mark Cersosimo who is part of the staff at Vimeo responded by saying, “I’d suggest filing a counter-notice. This is in the hands of our trust and safety team and we, unfortunately our support team cannot help you with this issue.”

This is the page that greets any user searching for the independent movie now.

TorrentFreak.com

 

Other targeted videos include:

  • “Pixels — Life Buoy,” the work of filmmaker Dragos Bardac and part of a project for his degree at the National University of Arts in Bucharest, Romania, uploaded in 2010.
  • “Detuned Pixels — Choco”, a dance music video uploaded in 2014
  • “Pantone Pixels”, a short film uploaded in 2011
  • An independent video produced by Franz Jeitz, a graphic designer who was targeted after announcing that he’ll be speaking at a panel in the 2015 Pixels Festival.

Ironically, the film’s own trailer was uprooted and removed from Vimeo as a result of the sweep, although the trailer was uploaded from unofficial sources.

Hacked staff contacted Vimeo, and received the following message from Sr. Communications Manager Kevin Turner:

Late last week, Vimeo removed certain videos pursuant to a DMCA takedown notice filed by Entura International claiming that the videos contained copyrighted content from the film Pixels. After users informed us that their videos did not contain any Pixels content, we reached out to Entura. Entura has since withdrawn its takedown notice. As a result, we have now restored the affected videos.

Image from Pixabay

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

Rate this post:

Important for improving the service. Please add a comment in the comment field below explaining what you rated and why you gave it that rate. Failed Trade Recommendations should not be rated as that is considered a failure either way.
0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this.
Loading...

Ali is a freelance journalist, having 5 years of experience in web journalism and marketing. He contributes to various online publications. With a master degree, now he combines his passions for writing about internet security and technology. When he is not working, he loves traveling and playing games.




Feedback or Requests?

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Smoovious

    August 14, 2015 at 12:24 am

    Entura should now be flagged for moderated action for any future takedown notices it submits.

    They’ve demonstrated their inattention to detail in their work, so they should no longer enjoy an automated takedown process, until they have been able to demonstrate that they have learned what the term “DUE DILIGENCE” means.

    They have abused the process.

  2. RJF

    August 14, 2015 at 4:14 pm

    What a bunch of BS! Entura & Columbia should be sued for infringing on all the previous projects using the word “Pixels” in their titles. Columbia infringed first and should have to pay all those small projects a use fee. As far as the lawyers, just bunch of clueless, money hungry baboons who could do us all a favor and leave this planet. BTW, the word “pixel” has been used for years in the public domain. Entura, go “F” yourself.

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Decentralization

JP Morgan’s Surprise Cryptocurrency Fees are a Reminder of Why Decentralization Is Sorely Needed

Published

on

JP Morgan Chase & Co has been hit with a class-action lawsuit by cryptocurrency traders over allegations of unannounced fees and higher interest rates on purchases of digital currencies. Though the allegations have not been proven, extra fees are a tactic routinely employed by traditional banking institutions. In the case of JP Morgan, this has karma written all over it given the way its chief executive has ridiculed digital assets by associating them with fraud.

Class Action Lawsuit

Traders from across the United States are seeking statutory damages of $1 million for unannounced interest charges and fees on cryptocurrency transactions between January and February of this year. The named plaintiff in the lawsuit is Brady Tucker, an Idaho resident who paid a total of $163.91 in fees and surprise interest charges over a six-day stretch.

According to information obtained by Reuters, the lawsuit accuses the bank of violating the U.S. Truth in Lending Act, a piece of legislation that requires credit card issuers to inform customers in writing of any notable change in fees.

The lawsuit asserts that Tucker tried to resolve the dispute by calling Chase’s customer support service directly. His request was turned down, prompting him to seek legal help. According to Bloomberg, the case in question is Tucker v. Chase Bank USA NA, 18-cv-3155, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).

The Growing Case for Decentralization

Depending on who you ask, the allegations against JP Morgan are akin to cryptocurrency fraud not unlike the kind Jamie Dimon talked about while ridiculing bitcoin. But the irony in Dimon’s comments extend far beyond Chase’s latest dealings.

As the actions of Chase bank and other financial institutions have clearly demonstrated over the years, those who control the size and growth rate of fiat money cannot be trusted to do the right thing. As Nassim Taleb argues in The Black Swan, banks have a tendency of losing as much money as they make in the long run due to shady business practices and high-risk ventures. Decisions like these are easy when you are Too Big to Fail.

Decentralization, like the kind advocated by blockchain startups and cryptocurrencies, allows users to trade directly with each other without having to go through a (predatory) middleman. Decentralized systems not only help participants avoid unnecessary fees, red tape and other forms of unwanted intervention, they are virtually impossible to shut down. In this vein, decentralized currencies give people a fighting chance in their battle against never-ending inflation. As we’ve argued before, this is not only a prudent fight, but a noble one as well.

Cryptocurrencies that rely on decentralization offer society a unique value proposition unlike anything we’ve seen in recent history. What’s more, their adoption is not contingent upon us leaving the realm of traditional finance – at least, not yet. That’s because cryptocurrency started off as an obscure and esoteric asset class but has since become a value store for investors. Tomorrow, it will become a viable medium of exchange accepted worldwide.

That said, we are still in the very early days of the crypto revolution and it may be a while still before we can conclusively prove people like Dimon wrong. But crypto backers and investors should take comfort in knowing that big banks rarely lead in disruption these days. They have the resources to play catch-up, which they are clearly doing with blockchain.

Disclaimer: The author owns bitcoin, Ethereum and other cryptocurrencies. He holds investment positions in the coins, but does not engage in short-term or day-trading.

Featured image courtesy of Shutterstock. 

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

Rate this post:

Important for improving the service. Please add a comment in the comment field below explaining what you rated and why you gave it that rate. Failed Trade Recommendations should not be rated as that is considered a failure either way.
2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this.
Loading...

4.6 stars on average, based on 546 rated postsSam Bourgi is Chief Editor to Hacked.com, where he specializes in cryptocurrency, economics and the broader financial markets. Sam has nearly eight years of progressive experience as an analyst, writer and financial market commentator where he has contributed to the world's foremost newscasts.




Feedback or Requests?

Continue Reading

Bitcoin

Digital Fraud & How to protect Yourself: From ICOs to Bitcoin Scams

Published

on

Digital fraud continues to grow apace. More worryingly, the increasing variety and sophistication of the scams themselves has seen the number of people falling victim to scams growing just as fast. And we are no longer just talking about standard phishing. Today’s digital criminals are highly developed and extremely quick to jump on the latest online trends to take full advantage of every opportunity.

As dispute resolution specialists we are often the first port of call for clients who have found themselves in particularly difficult situations. Unsurprisingly more and more of these situations involve digital fraud and we wanted to use this opportunity to outline some of the fastest growing and most regular scams and offer a little advice as to how you can separate scams from genuine opportunities.

1. Binary options (also known as all-or-nothing options, digital options and fixed return options) trading

A binary option is basically a financial option in which the pay-off is either a fixed monetary amount or nothing at all. There are two types of binary option:

§ A ‘cash-or-nothing’ option which will pay a fixed amount of cash if the option expires in profit

§ An ‘asset-or-nothing’ option which will pay the value of the underlying security

It is the ‘or nothing’ that’s attracted fraudsters and there are now hundreds of trading platforms operating outside the regulated financial markets.

The scam is simple. A fake company owns a website that makes them look like a legitimate binary options broker and offers users access to a ‘live’ trading environment whilst promising accuracy, transparency and guarantees designed to settle the nerves of a would be investor. The investor then makes an initial deposit which they will see grow online at which point they’ll be asked to deposit more.

Eventually, despite the appearance of healthy growth, the website will suddenly fold taking all of your deposits with it. Alternatively if you have asked to withdraw your investment, you may be asked to top up your account to take your balance to the minimum required to make a withdrawal … at which point the website will fold taking all of your deposits with it.

If you fall victim to a binary options scam, resolution can be tricky. As these are fake companies, it’s very hard to find out who the owners are never mind begin the process of recovering your money. Waters are muddied further by the fact they will most likely be operating outside the UK (Israel has the dubious honour of housing the majority of these fraudsters) and operating in an area with little or no regulatory environment.

2. Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs)

The easiest way to explain it is that it’s a type of crowdfunding that has grown out of the current growth in popularity of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. However instead of providing a shareholding in return for an injection of capital, the company seeking investment will release a fixed number of its own crypto-tokens then sell those tokens to investors. Usually the investors will pay for these tokens in Bitcoin but some will accept the major international currencies.

There is a common misconception that an ICO is the same as an IPO (an Initial Public Offering) but there are actually two major differences:

§ In an IPO the shares purchased by an investor are representative of their voting power and their level of ownership. This isn’t always the case with an ICO and just having the company’s cryptocurrency doesn’t guarantee voting or management rights; they are just something to be exchanged for other currencies at a later date.

§ As IPOs are an integral part of the world’s trading exchanges, they are heavily regulated. As cryptocurrency crowdfunding is new it does not yet enjoy the same protection which means any involvement carries as much risk as opportunity for an investor.

As this is still a developing area and an area that’s creating a bit of a buzz in the tech market, digital fraudsters have been quick to take note and fake investment opportunities are springing up at an increasing rate. Experience of resolving disputes after the fact has taught us a few lessons as to how to tell a real opportunity from a scam so if you are attracted by an ICO we would urge you to:

§ Make sure your investment will provide all of the ownership and voting rights you want

§ Understand the risks and if you are uncomfortable making a significant investment via a platform that sits outside the usual market regulations, this may not be for you

§ Do your due diligence and make sure the company offering the ICO is a going concern, has a recognised legal entity and that the project you want to invest in has the required research and staffing behind it

§ Make sure any investment you make will be is deposited into an escrow wallet and that at least one of the keys to that wallet is held by a trusted third party

§ Ensure you have a complete and professionally drafted set of legal terms and conditions signed both by you and by the company you are investing in

§ Ask around or search the internet in case no one has ever heard of the company launching or there is no record anywhere of the company and/or the entrepreneurs behind it

§ Ask to see both the business plan and a record of any work-in-progress (WIP); a negative or evasive response should be treated as a red flag

3. Bitcoin scams

Having hit its highest ever price, Bitcoin is currently in greater demand than it has ever been which means criminals have never been as active in finding different ways to exploit it for their own gain.

As it is so attractive the range of Bitcoin scams has grown almost impinged and the rise and rise of social media has provided the perfect platform for scammers to promote every variation. The list of scams we have come into contact with includes:

§ Malware downloads

Hugely attractive Bitcoin transactions are used to persuade you to download damaging software designed to damage or gain access to your computer.

§ Bitcoin phishing ‘impersonators’

Criminals use the Bitcoin logo to gain a victim’s trust then, once that trust is established, a phishing website entices users to enter their private Bitcoin key to check it exists in their database then the key is then phished and the associated account is emptied.

§ Bitcoin-flipping

After you pay a joining fee to exchange bitcoins and double any investment you make within a very short time-frame you find your bitcoins have been simply stolen.

§ Bitcoin pyramid schemes (also known as Multi-Level Marketing or MLM Schemes)

A high level of return is promised for a low level investment but the size of the return is linked to you sending the links to your friends to get them to join too. However once a few hundred people have signed up paid the joining fee, the scheme folds.

§ Fake Cloud Mining Services

Bitcoin “miners” validate transactions in the blockchain using complicated mathematical equations in exchange for new bitcoins. Scammers promise the same service then collect the ‘mining fees’ without actually doing any mining. Initially they will probably pay out a few small amounts but these soon dry up as the scammer disappears with the funds.

§ Bitcoin Investment Schemes

Again these scams promise high levels of return in return for providing low levels of capital for ‘investors’ who purport to trade digital currency. Like cloud mining scams they tend to pay out a few small returns then the payments stop and the scammer absconds with everything their victims have invested.

§ Fake Exchange Scams

Bitcoin exchanges (marketplaces that trade Bitcoin for traditional currency or other cryptocurrencies) are legitimate but fake exchanges are springing up every day. The fake exchanges will ask users to deposit funds to purchase Bitcoin whilst enjoying lower transaction fees than regular exchanges. The only thing is as these exchanges aren’t real, they never realise the promised return.

§ Bitcoin Donation Scams

In the wake of recent events, this is without doubt the most cynical type of scam. More and more scammers are creating fake donation pages asking people to donate in bitcoin rather than via better policed platforms like PayPal.

So how do you protect yourself? With all of these scams there is a basic rule, if it looks too good to be true, it probably is. If someone sends you a hugely attractive offer out of the blue, you need to immediately be on your guard.

Here are 4 basic rules we would urge you to follow:

§ Never trust any unsolicited email or social media post

§ Never click on any associated URL however high the potential return is claimed to be unless you know and trust the sender (and remember it’s now easy to replicate a social media account)

§ Never engage with or provide personal information in response to an email or social media account until you have checked to make sure the sender is 100% genuine.

§ Never enter into any type of financial transaction on the back of an email or a direct message on social media until you have completed all off your due diligence.

And if you do fall victim never try to resolve the situation on your own.

These may be criminals but they are highly sophisticated criminals and will be hidden behind layers of cleverly created camouflage. Always engage an experienced lawyer with a proven success record in resolving cross-border multi-jurisdictional disputes involving digital fraud. If you are going to recover lost funds, putting the right strategy in place immediately will be key to your success.

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

Rate this post:

Important for improving the service. Please add a comment in the comment field below explaining what you rated and why you gave it that rate. Failed Trade Recommendations should not be rated as that is considered a failure either way.
0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this.
Loading...

Richard Howlett is a lawyer at Selachii Solicitors in London. He acts for businesses and individuals in a range of disputes that include complex litigation, fraud, bitcoin and cryptocurrency.




Feedback or Requests?

Continue Reading

Law

A Judge Has Approved a Lawsuit to be Served via Twitter

Published

on

Non-profit St. Francis of Assisi has been prosecuting a lawsuit on behalf of the estates and families of Assyrian Christians were murdered and had their property destroyed as a result of ISIS/ISIL/Islamic State activities in the middle east. The group is suing Kuwait Finance House, Kuveyt-Turk Participation Bank Inc., and a man named Hajjaj al-Ajmi for having financed the terrorist groups, but has had trouble serving papers on al-Ajmi.

The plaintiffs noticed that al-Ajmi has an active Twitter account and asked a federal court to allow them to serve the papers that way. US Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler assented to this request, saying in a ruling:

The court grants St. Francis’s request because service via Twitter is reasonably calculated to give notice and is not prohibited by international agreement.

Also a Twitter Rebel

Hajjaj al-Ajmi was kicked off Twitter in 2014 following a Treasury Department sanction. However, in May of this year he created at least one new account, and currently has over 100,000 followers. At the time, al-Ajmi was actively raising funds for Islamic State efforts, even posting phone numbers for people to call and make donations through. Archived tweets and news coverage would provide ample evidence in a case against him.

4-al-ajmi-tweet

The St. Francis of Assisi is acting specifically on behalf of Christian victims of the Islamic State. Al-Ajmi’s status as a banned transactor by the Treasury Department, his history of being kicked off social media platforms for terrorist activities, and his general repertoire of anti-Christian, extremist Islam make him a ripe target for the proceedings. The other parties named in the suit have already been served by traditional means.

Not a First

The ruling notes that other cases in the past have allowed for the use of social media as an alternative means of serving papers. It noted the case of a trademark infringement suit against a Turkish citizen who could not be located. In that case, the court authorized e-mail, Facebook, and LinkedIn to be used. In a scam artistry case in which the Federal Trade Commission could not reach the alleged scam artists and could not get help from the Indian government, a federal court gave them permission to use the Facebook accounts of the parties named.

Probably Not a Normal Thing

Don’t worry, though. If you’re named in a lawsuit and you’re reachable by traditional methods, most likely you’re still going to be served in the traditional ways. One can imagine a future where frustrated process servers push for legislation to allow for the regular serving of papers via social media, and such an explicit law could conceivably make this ordeal the norm, but in all three of the largely known cases where this has happened, the plaintiffs had to get special permission from the court before considering social media serving to be in line with due process.

Important: Never invest (trade with) money you can't afford to comfortably lose. Always do your own research and due diligence before placing a trade. Read our Terms & Conditions here. Trade recommendations and analysis are written by our analysts which might have different opinions. Read my 6 Golden Steps to Financial Freedom here. Best regards, Jonas Borchgrevink.

Rate this post:

Important for improving the service. Please add a comment in the comment field below explaining what you rated and why you gave it that rate. Failed Trade Recommendations should not be rated as that is considered a failure either way.
0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this.
Loading...

5 stars on average, based on 2 rated postsP. H. Madore has covered the cryptocurrency beat over the course of hundreds of articles for Hacked's sister site, CryptoCoinsNews, as well as some of her competitors. He is a major contributing developer to the Woodcoin project, and has made technical contributions on a number of other cryptocurrency projects. In spare time, he recently began a more personalized, weekly newsletter at http://ico.phm.link




Feedback or Requests?

Continue Reading

5 of 15 Seats Available

Learn more here.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

A part of CCN

Hacked.com is Neutral and Unbiased

Hacked.com and its team members have pledged to reject any form of advertisement or sponsorships from 3rd parties. We will always be neutral and we strive towards a fully unbiased view on all topics. Whenever an author has a conflicting interest, that should be clearly stated in the post itself with a disclaimer. If you suspect that one of our team members are biased, please notify me immediately at jonas.borchgrevink(at)hacked.com.

Trending