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Opinion: Bridging the Cybersecurity Gender Gap

Opinion: Bridging the Cybersecurity Gender Gap

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by Rebecca CampbellAugust 19, 2016

In an opinion piece in the Christian Science Monitor, more needs to be done to attract more women to the cybersecurity fields.

According to the CSM, in 2015, a mere 25 percent of women held computing jobs while companies such as Twitter and Google have been widely criticized for not bridging the gender gap in the workforce.

Not only that, but a report from the Women’s Society of Cyberjutsu found that only 11 percent of jobs in the cybersecurity field were held by women.

Digital Privacy Ahead of its Game

When it comes to digital privacy, though, it has done much better compared to other fields.


Well, according to CSM, it’s down to the fact that ‘privacy is an accessible and multidisciplinary field that is frequently taught in law and public policy courses.’

As a consequence, professionals from industries such as law, policy, and human resource management have dominated the industry as they bring more women to the jobs.

This is compared to the cybersecurity workforce, which tends to be a male-dominated industry that attracts computer science and national security personnel.

CSM said:

As a result, the culture of security largely mirrors that of technogeeks, cops, and spooks.

Striking a Gender Balance

When it comes to the privacy industry they are more favored to approaching a gender balance: civil liberties, consumer protection, equality, and reproductive rights. On the other hand, the securities industry is more competitive with many women facing challenges, particularly when it comes to equal pay.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the pay for a chief privacy officer is under $200,000 while that of a chief information security officer is typically $300,000; however, this can rise to $500,000 in big companies.

CSM reported that the women in the privacy industry felt that their profession was undervalued compared to security. The two areas often face the same risks; however, with privacy, they don’t always reap the same rewards as those within security.

Featured image from Shutterstock.

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